Challenges in measuring measles case fatality ratios in settings without vital registration

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/115152
Title:
Challenges in measuring measles case fatality ratios in settings without vital registration
Authors:
Cairns, K L; Nandy, R; Grais, R
Journal:
Emerging Themes in Epidemiology
Abstract:
ABSTRACT: Measles, a highly infectious vaccine-preventable viral disease, is potentially fatal. Historically, measles case-fatality ratios (CFRs) have been reported to vary from 0.1% in the developed world to as high as 30% in emergency settings. Estimates of the global burden of mortality from measles, critical to prioritizing measles vaccination among other health interventions, are highly sensitive to the CFR estimates used in modeling; however, due to the lack of reliable, up-to-date data, considerable debate exists as to what CFR estimates are appropriate to use. To determine current measles CFRs in high-burden settings without vital registration we have conducted six retrospective measles mortality studies in such settings. This paper examines the methodological challenges of this work and our solutions to these challenges, including the integration of lessons from retrospective all-cause mortality studies into CFR studies, approaches to laboratory confirmation of outbreaks, and means of obtaining a representative sample of case-patients. Our experiences are relevant to those conducting retrospective CFR studies for measles or other diseases, and to those interested in all-cause mortality studies.
Affiliation:
Global Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; Health Section, UNICEF, UN Plaza, New York, NY, USA; Epicentre, Paris, France
Issue Date:
19-Jul-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/115152
DOI:
10.1186/1742-7622-7-4
PubMed ID:
20642812
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2918600/?tool=pubmed
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1742-7622
Appears in Collections:
Research Methods

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCairns, K Len
dc.contributor.authorNandy, Ren
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-09T14:54:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-09T14:54:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010-07-19-
dc.identifier.citationEmerg Themes Epidemiol 2010;7(1):4en
dc.identifier.issn1742-7622-
dc.identifier.pmid20642812-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1742-7622-7-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/115152-
dc.description.abstractABSTRACT: Measles, a highly infectious vaccine-preventable viral disease, is potentially fatal. Historically, measles case-fatality ratios (CFRs) have been reported to vary from 0.1% in the developed world to as high as 30% in emergency settings. Estimates of the global burden of mortality from measles, critical to prioritizing measles vaccination among other health interventions, are highly sensitive to the CFR estimates used in modeling; however, due to the lack of reliable, up-to-date data, considerable debate exists as to what CFR estimates are appropriate to use. To determine current measles CFRs in high-burden settings without vital registration we have conducted six retrospective measles mortality studies in such settings. This paper examines the methodological challenges of this work and our solutions to these challenges, including the integration of lessons from retrospective all-cause mortality studies into CFR studies, approaches to laboratory confirmation of outbreaks, and means of obtaining a representative sample of case-patients. Our experiences are relevant to those conducting retrospective CFR studies for measles or other diseases, and to those interested in all-cause mortality studies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2918600/?tool=pubmeden
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Emerging Themes in Epidemiology's Open Accessen
dc.titleChallenges in measuring measles case fatality ratios in settings without vital registrationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGlobal Immunization Division, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA; Health Section, UNICEF, UN Plaza, New York, NY, USA; Epicentre, Paris, Franceen
dc.identifier.journalEmerging Themes in Epidemiologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.