Risk factors for buruli ulcer: a case control study in Cameroon

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/116351
Title:
Risk factors for buruli ulcer: a case control study in Cameroon
Authors:
Pouillot, Régis; Matias, Gonçalo; Wondje, Christelle Mbondji; Portaels, Françoise; Valin, Nadia; Ngos, François; Njikap, Adelaïde; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara
Journal:
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. However, the exact mechanism of transmission of the bacillus and the development of the disease through human activities is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control study to identify Buruli ulcer risk factors in Cameroon compared case-patients with community-matched controls on one hand and family-matched controls on the other hand. Risk factors identified by the community-matched study (including 163 pairs) were: having a low level of education, swamp wading, wearing short, lower-body clothing while farming, living near a cocoa plantation or woods, using adhesive bandages when hurt, and using mosquito coils. Protective factors were: using bed nets, washing clothes, and using leaves as traditional treatment or rubbing alcohol when hurt. The family-matched study (including 118 pairs) corroborated the significance of education level, use of bed nets, and treatment with leaves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Covering limbs during farming activities is confirmed as a protective factor guarding against Buruli ulcer disease, but newly identified factors including wound treatment and use of bed nets may provide new insight into the unknown mode of transmission of M. ulcerans or the development of the disease.
Affiliation:
Laboratoire d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Unite´ d’Epide´miologie des Maladies Emergentes, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; Laboratoire des Mycobacte´ ries, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaounde , Cameroon; Mycobacterium Unit, Institute of Tropical Medecine, Antwerp, Belgium; Hopital de District d’Akonolinga, Ministere de la Sante Publique, Yaounde, Cameroon; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Suisse, Yaounde, Cameroon; Groupe d’Etude des Interactions Hotes Parasites, Universite d Angers, Angers, France; Equipe Avenir Institut National de la Sante´ et de la Recherche Me´ dicale, Institut Pasteur Korea, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, Korea
Issue Date:
19-Dec-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/116351
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0000101
PubMed ID:
18160977
Additional Links:
http://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0000101
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1935-2735
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPouillot, Régisen
dc.contributor.authorMatias, Gonçaloen
dc.contributor.authorWondje, Christelle Mbondjien
dc.contributor.authorPortaels, Françoiseen
dc.contributor.authorValin, Nadiaen
dc.contributor.authorNgos, Françoisen
dc.contributor.authorNjikap, Adelaïdeen
dc.contributor.authorMarsollier, Laurenten
dc.contributor.authorFontanet, Arnauden
dc.contributor.authorEyangoh, Saraen
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-25T19:07:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-25T19:07:26Z-
dc.date.issued2007-12-19-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS Negl Trop Dis 2007;1(3):e101en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735-
dc.identifier.pmid18160977-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0000101-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/116351-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. However, the exact mechanism of transmission of the bacillus and the development of the disease through human activities is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control study to identify Buruli ulcer risk factors in Cameroon compared case-patients with community-matched controls on one hand and family-matched controls on the other hand. Risk factors identified by the community-matched study (including 163 pairs) were: having a low level of education, swamp wading, wearing short, lower-body clothing while farming, living near a cocoa plantation or woods, using adhesive bandages when hurt, and using mosquito coils. Protective factors were: using bed nets, washing clothes, and using leaves as traditional treatment or rubbing alcohol when hurt. The family-matched study (including 118 pairs) corroborated the significance of education level, use of bed nets, and treatment with leaves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Covering limbs during farming activities is confirmed as a protective factor guarding against Buruli ulcer disease, but newly identified factors including wound treatment and use of bed nets may provide new insight into the unknown mode of transmission of M. ulcerans or the development of the disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.plosntds.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pntd.0000101en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshBuruli Ulceren
dc.subject.meshCameroonen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium ulceransen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen
dc.titleRisk factors for buruli ulcer: a case control study in Cameroonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratoire d'Epidémiologie et de Santé Publique, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaoundé, Cameroon; Unite´ d’Epide´miologie des Maladies Emergentes, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; Laboratoire des Mycobacte´ ries, Centre Pasteur du Cameroun, Yaounde , Cameroon; Mycobacterium Unit, Institute of Tropical Medecine, Antwerp, Belgium; Hopital de District d’Akonolinga, Ministere de la Sante Publique, Yaounde, Cameroon; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Suisse, Yaounde, Cameroon; Groupe d’Etude des Interactions Hotes Parasites, Universite d Angers, Angers, France; Equipe Avenir Institut National de la Sante´ et de la Recherche Me´ dicale, Institut Pasteur Korea, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, Koreaen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen

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