Measles hotspots and epidemiological connectivity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/125627
Title:
Measles hotspots and epidemiological connectivity
Authors:
Bharti, N; Djibo, A; Ferrari, M J; Grais, R F; Tatem, A J; McCabe, C A; Bjornstad, O N; Grenfell, B T
Journal:
Epidemiology and Infection
Abstract:
Though largely controlled in developed countries, measles remains a major global public health issue. Regional and local transmission patterns are rooted in human mixing behaviour across spatial scales. Identifying spatial interactions that contribute to recurring epidemics helps define and predict outbreak patterns. Using spatially explicit reported cases from measles outbreaks in Niger, we explored how regional variations in movement and contact patterns relate to patterns of measles incidence. Because we expected to see lower rates of re-introductions in small, compared to large, populations, we measured the population-size corrected proportion of weeks with zero cases across districts to understand relative rates of measles re-introductions. We found that critical elements of spatial disease dynamics in Niger are agricultural seasonality, transnational contact clusters, and roads networks that facilitate host movement and connectivity. These results highlight the need to understand local patterns of seasonality, demographic characteristics, and spatial heterogeneities to inform vaccination policy.
Affiliation:
Penn State University, Biology Department and Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, University Park, PA, USA; Ministry of Health, Niamey, Niger; Epicentre, Paris, France; University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute and Department of Geography, Gainesville, FL, USA; Penn State University, Department of Geography and GeoVISTA Center, University Park, PA, USA; Penn State University, Department of Entomology, University Park, PA, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
Issue Date:
25-Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/125627
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268809991385
PubMed ID:
20096146
Additional Links:
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7849213
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1469-4409
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBharti, Nen
dc.contributor.authorDjibo, Aen
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, M Jen
dc.contributor.authorGrais, R Fen
dc.contributor.authorTatem, A Jen
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, C Aen
dc.contributor.authorBjornstad, O Nen
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, B Ten
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-24T22:40:27Z-
dc.date.available2011-03-24T22:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-25-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiol. Infect. 2010;138(9):1308-16en
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid20096146-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268809991385-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/125627-
dc.description.abstractThough largely controlled in developed countries, measles remains a major global public health issue. Regional and local transmission patterns are rooted in human mixing behaviour across spatial scales. Identifying spatial interactions that contribute to recurring epidemics helps define and predict outbreak patterns. Using spatially explicit reported cases from measles outbreaks in Niger, we explored how regional variations in movement and contact patterns relate to patterns of measles incidence. Because we expected to see lower rates of re-introductions in small, compared to large, populations, we measured the population-size corrected proportion of weeks with zero cases across districts to understand relative rates of measles re-introductions. We found that critical elements of spatial disease dynamics in Niger are agricultural seasonality, transnational contact clusters, and roads networks that facilitate host movement and connectivity. These results highlight the need to understand local patterns of seasonality, demographic characteristics, and spatial heterogeneities to inform vaccination policy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=7849213en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and Infectionen
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen
dc.subject.meshMeaslesen
dc.subject.meshMeasles Vaccineen
dc.subject.meshNigeren
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen
dc.subject.meshProportional Hazards Modelsen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen
dc.subject.meshUrban Populationen
dc.titleMeasles hotspots and epidemiological connectivityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPenn State University, Biology Department and Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, University Park, PA, USA; Ministry of Health, Niamey, Niger; Epicentre, Paris, France; University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute and Department of Geography, Gainesville, FL, USA; Penn State University, Department of Geography and GeoVISTA Center, University Park, PA, USA; Penn State University, Department of Entomology, University Park, PA, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAen
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infectionen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.