Modelling the first dose of measles vaccination: the role of maternal immunity, demographic factors, and delivery systems.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/129954
Title:
Modelling the first dose of measles vaccination: the role of maternal immunity, demographic factors, and delivery systems.
Authors:
Metcalf, C J E; Klepac, P; Ferrari, M; Grais, R F; Djibo, A; Grenfell, B T
Journal:
Epidemiology and Infection
Abstract:
Measles vaccine efficacy is higher at 12 months than 9 months because of maternal immunity, but delaying vaccination exposes the children most vulnerable to measles mortality to infection. We explored how this trade-off changes as a function of regionally varying epidemiological drivers, e.g. demography, transmission seasonality, and vaccination coverage. High birth rates and low coverage both favour early vaccination, and initiating vaccination at 9-11 months, then switching to 12-14 months can reduce case numbers. Overall however, increasing the age-window of vaccination decreases case numbers relative to vaccinating within a narrow age-window (e.g. 9-11 months). The width of the age-window that minimizes mortality varies as a function of birth rate, vaccination coverage and patterns of access to care. Our results suggest that locally age-targeted strategies, at both national and sub-national scales, tuned to local variation in birth rate, seasonality, and access to care may substantially decrease case numbers and fatalities for routine vaccination.
Affiliation:
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, NJ 0854, USA. cmetcalf@princeton.edu
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/129954
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268810001329
PubMed ID:
20525415
Additional Links:
http://journalseek.net/
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1469-4409
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMetcalf, C J Een
dc.contributor.authorKlepac, Pen
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Men
dc.contributor.authorGrais, R Fen
dc.contributor.authorDjibo, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, B Ten
dc.date.accessioned2011-05-23T20:55:41Z-
dc.date.available2011-05-23T20:55:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.identifier.citationModelling the first dose of measles vaccination: the role of maternal immunity, demographic factors, and delivery systems. 2011, 139 (2):265-74 Epidemiol. Infect.en
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid20525415-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268810001329-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/129954-
dc.description.abstractMeasles vaccine efficacy is higher at 12 months than 9 months because of maternal immunity, but delaying vaccination exposes the children most vulnerable to measles mortality to infection. We explored how this trade-off changes as a function of regionally varying epidemiological drivers, e.g. demography, transmission seasonality, and vaccination coverage. High birth rates and low coverage both favour early vaccination, and initiating vaccination at 9-11 months, then switching to 12-14 months can reduce case numbers. Overall however, increasing the age-window of vaccination decreases case numbers relative to vaccinating within a narrow age-window (e.g. 9-11 months). The width of the age-window that minimizes mortality varies as a function of birth rate, vaccination coverage and patterns of access to care. Our results suggest that locally age-targeted strategies, at both national and sub-national scales, tuned to local variation in birth rate, seasonality, and access to care may substantially decrease case numbers and fatalities for routine vaccination.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journalseek.net/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and Infection and Cambridge University Pressen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunity, Maternally-Acquireden
dc.subject.meshImmunization Scheduleen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshMeaslesen
dc.subject.meshMeasles Vaccineen
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen
dc.subject.meshVaccinationen
dc.titleModelling the first dose of measles vaccination: the role of maternal immunity, demographic factors, and delivery systems.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, NJ 0854, USA. cmetcalf@princeton.eduen
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infectionen

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