Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Humanitarian Relief Interventions: Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment in the Sudan.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17266
Title:
Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Humanitarian Relief Interventions: Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment in the Sudan.
Authors:
Griekspoor, A; Sondorp, H; Vos, T
Journal:
Health Policy and Planning
Abstract:
Spending by aid agencies on emergencies has quadrupled over the last decade, to over US$6 billion. To date, cost-effectiveness has seldom been considered in the prioritization and evaluation of emergency interventions. The sheer volume of resources spent on humanitarian aid and the chronicity of many humanitarian interventions call for more attention to be paid to the issue of 'value for money'. In this paper we present data from a major humanitarian crisis, an epidemic of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in war-torn Sudan. The special circumstances provided us, in retrospect, with unusually accurate data on excess mortality, costs of the intervention and its effects, thus allowing us to express cost-effectiveness as the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. The cost-effectiveness ratio, of US$18.40 per DALY (uncertainty range between US$13.53 and US$27.63), places the treatment of VL in Sudan among health interventions considered 'very good value for money' (interventions of less than US$25 per DALY). We discuss the usefulness of this analysis to the internal management of the VL programme, the procurement of funds for the programme, and more generally, to priority setting in humanitarian relief interventions. We feel that in evaluations of emergency interventions attempts could be made more often to perform cost-effectiveness analyses, including the use of DALYs, provided that the outcomes of these analyses are seen in the broad context of the emergency situation and its consequences on the affected population. This paper provides a first contribution to what is hoped to become an international database of cost-effectiveness studies of health interventions during relief operations, which use a comparable measure of health outcome such as the DALY.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Publisher:
Published by Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
Mar-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17266
PubMed ID:
10351471
Additional Links:
http://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/14/1/70?ijkey=pgr/use0b0OTg&keytype=ref&siteid=heapol
Language:
en
Description:
To access this article, click on "Additional Links"
ISSN:
0268-1080
Appears in Collections:
Leishmaniasis/Kala Azar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriekspoor, A-
dc.contributor.authorSondorp, H-
dc.contributor.authorVos, T-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-31T16:09:48Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-31T16:09:48Z-
dc.date.issued1999-03-
dc.identifier.citationCost-Effectiveness Analysis of Humanitarian Relief Interventions: Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment in the Sudan. 1999, 14 (1):70-6notHealth Policy Planen
dc.identifier.issn0268-1080-
dc.identifier.pmid10351471-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17266-
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links"-
dc.description.abstractSpending by aid agencies on emergencies has quadrupled over the last decade, to over US$6 billion. To date, cost-effectiveness has seldom been considered in the prioritization and evaluation of emergency interventions. The sheer volume of resources spent on humanitarian aid and the chronicity of many humanitarian interventions call for more attention to be paid to the issue of 'value for money'. In this paper we present data from a major humanitarian crisis, an epidemic of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in war-torn Sudan. The special circumstances provided us, in retrospect, with unusually accurate data on excess mortality, costs of the intervention and its effects, thus allowing us to express cost-effectiveness as the cost per Disability Adjusted Life Year (DALY) averted. The cost-effectiveness ratio, of US$18.40 per DALY (uncertainty range between US$13.53 and US$27.63), places the treatment of VL in Sudan among health interventions considered 'very good value for money' (interventions of less than US$25 per DALY). We discuss the usefulness of this analysis to the internal management of the VL programme, the procurement of funds for the programme, and more generally, to priority setting in humanitarian relief interventions. We feel that in evaluations of emergency interventions attempts could be made more often to perform cost-effectiveness analyses, including the use of DALYs, provided that the outcomes of these analyses are seen in the broad context of the emergency situation and its consequences on the affected population. This paper provides a first contribution to what is hoped to become an international database of cost-effectiveness studies of health interventions during relief operations, which use a comparable measure of health outcome such as the DALY.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublished by Oxford University Press-
dc.relation.urlhttp://heapol.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/14/1/70?ijkey=pgr/use0b0OTg&keytype=ref&siteid=heapol-
dc.rightsArchived on this site with kind permission from Oxford University Pressen
dc.subject.meshAltruismen
dc.subject.meshAntiprotozoal Agentsen
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen
dc.subject.meshDelivery of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshDeveloping Countriesen
dc.subject.meshDisabled Personsen
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Researchen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLeishmaniasis, Visceralen
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en
dc.subject.meshProgram Evaluationen
dc.subject.meshRelief Worken
dc.subject.meshSudanen
dc.subject.meshValue of Lifeen
dc.titleCost-Effectiveness Analysis of Humanitarian Relief Interventions: Visceral Leishmaniasis Treatment in the Sudan.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.en
dc.identifier.journalHealth Policy and Planningen
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