Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected individuals after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment in Thyolo, Malawi.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17294
Title:
Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected individuals after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment in Thyolo, Malawi.
Authors:
Zachariah, R; Spielmann M P; Harries, A D; Gomani, P; Bakali, E
Journal:
International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Abstract:
SETTING: Thyolo, rural southern Malawi. OBJECTIVES: To determine 1) the proportion who continue with cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for the prevention of opportunistic infections, and 2) the reasons for continuing or stopping prophylaxis, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with tuberculosis (TB) who complete anti-tuberculosis treatment. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: A questionnaire study of all HIV-infected TB patients who had been registered over a 3-month period to receive anti-tuberculosis treatment and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and who had completed antituberculosis treatment 3-6 months earlier. RESULTS: Of 82 HIV-infected individuals who were alive at the time of interview, 76 (93%) were continuing with cotrimoxazole and wished to do so indefinitely. The most common reason for continuing the drug was to prevent illness associated with HIV, while the most common reason for stopping was long distances to the health facility. Ninety-six percent of patients received cotrimoxazole free of charge from a health centre. Of those who wished to continue indefinitely, the majority (63%) could not afford to pay for the drug. CONCLUSIONS: In a rural setting, the great majority of HIV-infected individuals continued with cotrimoxazole after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment. Making the drug available and providing it free of charge is essential if it is to remain accessible for longer term prevention.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières-Luxembourg, Thyolo, Thyolo District, Malawi. zachariah@internet.lu
Issue Date:
Dec-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17294
PubMed ID:
12546111
Language:
en
ISSN:
1027-3719
Appears in Collections:
TB

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R-
dc.contributor.authorSpielmann M P-
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A D-
dc.contributor.authorGomani, P-
dc.contributor.authorBakali, E-
dc.date.accessioned2008-01-31T17:02:53Z-
dc.date.available2008-01-31T17:02:53Z-
dc.date.issued2002-12-
dc.identifier.citationCotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected individuals after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment in Thyolo, Malawi. 2002, 6 (12):1046-50 Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1027-3719-
dc.identifier.pmid12546111-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17294-
dc.description.abstractSETTING: Thyolo, rural southern Malawi. OBJECTIVES: To determine 1) the proportion who continue with cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for the prevention of opportunistic infections, and 2) the reasons for continuing or stopping prophylaxis, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with tuberculosis (TB) who complete anti-tuberculosis treatment. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: A questionnaire study of all HIV-infected TB patients who had been registered over a 3-month period to receive anti-tuberculosis treatment and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis and who had completed antituberculosis treatment 3-6 months earlier. RESULTS: Of 82 HIV-infected individuals who were alive at the time of interview, 76 (93%) were continuing with cotrimoxazole and wished to do so indefinitely. The most common reason for continuing the drug was to prevent illness associated with HIV, while the most common reason for stopping was long distances to the health facility. Ninety-six percent of patients received cotrimoxazole free of charge from a health centre. Of those who wished to continue indefinitely, the majority (63%) could not afford to pay for the drug. CONCLUSIONS: In a rural setting, the great majority of HIV-infected individuals continued with cotrimoxazole after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment. Making the drug available and providing it free of charge is essential if it is to remain accessible for longer term prevention.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of the International Union Against TB and Lung Disease (www.iuatld.org)en
dc.subject.meshAIDS-Related Opportunistic Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAnti-Infective Agentsen
dc.subject.meshAntitubercular Agentsen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMalawien
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen
dc.subject.meshTrimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combinationen
dc.subject.meshTuberculosisen
dc.titleCotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-infected individuals after completing anti-tuberculosis treatment in Thyolo, Malawi.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières-Luxembourg, Thyolo, Thyolo District, Malawi. zachariah@internet.luen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen

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