Motives, sexual behaviour, and risk factors associated with HIV in individuals seeking voluntary counselling and testing in a rural district of Malawi.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17725
Title:
Motives, sexual behaviour, and risk factors associated with HIV in individuals seeking voluntary counselling and testing in a rural district of Malawi.
Authors:
Zachariah, R; Spielmann M P; Harries, A D; Buhendwa, L; Chingi, C
Journal:
Tropical Doctor
Abstract:
A study was conducted among individuals seeking voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) in order to (a) describe their motives and source(s) of information, (b) describe their sexual behaviour; and (c) identify risk factors associated with HIV infection. Of 723 individuals who sought VCT, the most common reason (50%) was recent knowledge of HIV/AIDS and a desire to know their HIV status. The majority (77%) underwent VCT after being encouraged by others who knew their status. Ninety five per cent reported sexual encounters, with 337 (49%) engaging in unprotected sex. HIV prevalence was 31% and an HIV-positive status was associated with being female, being over 25 years of age and/or being a farmer. There is a demand for VCT, and the service provides an opportunity for intensive education about HIV/AIDS prevention on a one-to-one basis. It could also be an entry point to prevention and care for those who are infected.
Affiliation:
Medecins sans Frontieres, Thyolo, Malawi. zachariah@internet.lu
Issue Date:
Apr-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17725
PubMed ID:
12680541
Additional Links:
http://td.rsmjournals.com
Language:
en
ISSN:
0049-4755
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R-
dc.contributor.authorSpielmann M P-
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A D-
dc.contributor.authorBuhendwa, L-
dc.contributor.authorChingi, C-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-07T16:35:56Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-07T16:35:56Z-
dc.date.issued2003-04-
dc.identifier.citationMotives, sexual behaviour, and risk factors associated with HIV in individuals seeking voluntary counselling and testing in a rural district of Malawi. 2003, 33 (2):88-91notTrop Docten
dc.identifier.issn0049-4755-
dc.identifier.pmid12680541-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17725-
dc.description.abstractA study was conducted among individuals seeking voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) in order to (a) describe their motives and source(s) of information, (b) describe their sexual behaviour; and (c) identify risk factors associated with HIV infection. Of 723 individuals who sought VCT, the most common reason (50%) was recent knowledge of HIV/AIDS and a desire to know their HIV status. The majority (77%) underwent VCT after being encouraged by others who knew their status. Ninety five per cent reported sexual encounters, with 337 (49%) engaging in unprotected sex. HIV prevalence was 31% and an HIV-positive status was associated with being female, being over 25 years of age and/or being a farmer. There is a demand for VCT, and the service provides an opportunity for intensive education about HIV/AIDS prevention on a one-to-one basis. It could also be an entry point to prevention and care for those who are infected.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://td.rsmjournals.com-
dc.rightsReproduced on this site with the permission of Royal Society of Medicine Press, Londonen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInterviews as Topicen
dc.subject.meshMalawien
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPatient Acceptance of Health Careen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshRural Healthen
dc.subject.meshSexual Behavioren
dc.titleMotives, sexual behaviour, and risk factors associated with HIV in individuals seeking voluntary counselling and testing in a rural district of Malawi.en
dc.contributor.departmentMedecins sans Frontieres, Thyolo, Malawi. zachariah@internet.luen
dc.identifier.journalTropical Doctoren

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