Humanitarian Action and Military Intervention: Temptations and Possibilities.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17736
Title:
Humanitarian Action and Military Intervention: Temptations and Possibilities.
Authors:
Weissman, F
Journal:
Disasters
Abstract:
Although the war in Liberia in July 2003 claimed hundreds of lives, the international community was reluctant to intervene. In this article, the author debates the question: does international military intervention equal protection of populations? The role of humanitarian organisations in military intervention is considered. Aid organisations cannot call for deployment of a protection force without renouncing their autonomy or appealing to references outside their own practices. Such organisations provide victims with vital assistance and contribute to ensuring that their fate becomes a stake in political debate by exposing the violence that engulfs them, without substituting their own voices for those of the victims. The political content of humanitarian action is also outlined and military intervention in the context of genocide is discussed. The author concludes that the latter is one of the rare situations in which humanitarian actors can consider calling for an armed intervention without renouncing their own logic.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières France, 8 Rue Saint Sabin, Paris 75011, France. Fabrice.weissman@paris.msf.org
Publisher:
Published by Wiley-Blackwell
Issue Date:
Jun-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/17736
DOI:
10.1111/j.0361-3666.2004.00253.x
PubMed ID:
15186365
Additional Links:
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/DISA
Language:
en
ISSN:
0361-3666
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWeissman, F-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-07T16:17:28Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-07T16:17:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004-06-
dc.identifier.citationHumanitarian Action and Military Intervention: Temptations and Possibilities. 2004, 28 (2):205-15notDisastersen
dc.identifier.issn0361-3666-
dc.identifier.pmid15186365-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.0361-3666.2004.00253.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/17736-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the war in Liberia in July 2003 claimed hundreds of lives, the international community was reluctant to intervene. In this article, the author debates the question: does international military intervention equal protection of populations? The role of humanitarian organisations in military intervention is considered. Aid organisations cannot call for deployment of a protection force without renouncing their autonomy or appealing to references outside their own practices. Such organisations provide victims with vital assistance and contribute to ensuring that their fate becomes a stake in political debate by exposing the violence that engulfs them, without substituting their own voices for those of the victims. The political content of humanitarian action is also outlined and military intervention in the context of genocide is discussed. The author concludes that the latter is one of the rare situations in which humanitarian actors can consider calling for an armed intervention without renouncing their own logic.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublished by Wiley-Blackwell-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/DISA-
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of Wiley-Blackwellen
dc.subject.meshAltruismen
dc.subject.meshHomicideen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInternational Cooperationen
dc.subject.meshLiberiaen
dc.subject.meshPoliticsen
dc.subject.meshWaren
dc.subject.meshWorld Healthen
dc.titleHumanitarian Action and Military Intervention: Temptations and Possibilities.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières France, 8 Rue Saint Sabin, Paris 75011, France. Fabrice.weissman@paris.msf.orgen
dc.identifier.journalDisastersen
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