MSF Field Research > 1 Published Research and Commentary > HIV/AIDS > Scaling-up co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in high HIV-prevalence countries.

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18253
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!


Download this article:
View/Open File Description Size Format
Thumbnail
View/Open
Lancet inf dis Rony CTX.pdf116KbAdobe PDF

Title: Scaling-up co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in high HIV-prevalence countries.
Authors: Zachariah, Rony
Harries, A D
Luo, Chewe
Bachman, Gretchen
Graham, S M
Affiliation: Médecins Sans Frontières, Medical department (Operational Research), Brussels Operational Center, Brussels, Belgium. zachariah@internet.lu
Citation: Scaling-up co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in high HIV-prevalence countries. 2007, 7 (10):686-93notLancet Infect Dis
Publisher: Elsevier
Journal: The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Issue Date: Oct-2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18253
DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(07)70239-6
PubMed ID: 17897611
Additional Links: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laninf
Abstract: Co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) is a widely available antibiotic that substantially reduces HIV-related morbidity and mortality in both adults and children. Prophylaxis with co-trimoxazole is a recommended intervention of proven benefit that could serve not only as an initial step towards improving paediatric care in young children with limited access to antiretroviral treatment, but also as an important complement to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Despite co-trimoxazole's known clinical benefits, the potential operational benefits, and favourable recommendations by WHO, UNAIDS, and UNICEF, its routine use in developing countries--particularly sub-Saharan Africa--has remained limited. Out of an estimated 4 million children in need of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis (HIV-exposed and HIV-infected), only 4% are currently receiving this intervention. We discuss some of the major barriers preventing the scale-up of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis for children in countries with a high prevalence of HIV and propose specific actions required to tackle these challenges.
Language: en
MeSH: AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections
Adolescent
Anti-Infective Agents
Chemoprevention
Child
Child, Preschool
Developing Countries
HIV Infections
Health Policy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Combination
ISSN: 1473-3099
Rights: Reproduced on this site with permission of Elsevier Ltd. Please see www.TheLancet.com/journals/laninf for further relevant comment.
Appears in topics: HIV/AIDS

Related articles on PubMed
bullet
bullet


2014 Dec
bullet
bullet
bullet
Prioritizing HIV care and support interventions-moving from evidence to policy.
Langley CL, Lapidos-Salaiz I, Hamm TE, Bateganya MH, Firth J, Wilson M, Martin J, Dierberg K
2015 Apr 15
See all 111 articles

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies

My MSF

MSF logo MSF Field Research

Jul 3, 2015