Using indirect methods to understand the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18274
Title:
Using indirect methods to understand the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality.
Authors:
Singh, K; Karunakara, U; Burnham, G; Hill, K
Journal:
Journal of Biosocial Science
Abstract:
Despite the large numbers of displaced persons and the often-lengthy periods of displacement, little is known about the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality. This paper looks at the Brass Method (and adaptations of this method) and the Preceding Birth Technique in combination with a classification of women by their migration and reproductive histories, in order to study the impact of forced migration on under-five mortality. Data came from the Demography of Forced Migration Project, a study on mortality, fertility and violence in the refugee and host populations of Arua District, Uganda and Yei River District, Sudan. Results indicate that women who did not migrate in a situation of conflict and women who repatriated before the age of 15, had children with the highest under-five mortality rates compared with women who were currently refugees and women who repatriated after the age of 15.
Affiliation:
MEASURE Evaluation, UNC-Chapel Hill, USA.
Issue Date:
Nov-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18274
DOI:
10.1017/S002193200400700X
PubMed ID:
16221323
Language:
en
ISSN:
0021-9320
Appears in Collections:
Paediatrics; Research Methods

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSingh, K-
dc.contributor.authorKarunakara, U-
dc.contributor.authorBurnham, G-
dc.contributor.authorHill, K-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-14T11:32:04Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-14T11:32:04Z-
dc.date.issued2005-11-
dc.identifier.citationUsing indirect methods to understand the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality. 2005, 37 (6):741-60notJ Biosoc Scien
dc.identifier.issn0021-9320-
dc.identifier.pmid16221323-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S002193200400700X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18274-
dc.description.abstractDespite the large numbers of displaced persons and the often-lengthy periods of displacement, little is known about the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality. This paper looks at the Brass Method (and adaptations of this method) and the Preceding Birth Technique in combination with a classification of women by their migration and reproductive histories, in order to study the impact of forced migration on under-five mortality. Data came from the Demography of Forced Migration Project, a study on mortality, fertility and violence in the refugee and host populations of Arua District, Uganda and Yei River District, Sudan. Results indicate that women who did not migrate in a situation of conflict and women who repatriated before the age of 15, had children with the highest under-five mortality rates compared with women who were currently refugees and women who repatriated after the age of 15.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Biosocial Scienceen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshCatchment Area (Health)en
dc.subject.meshCoercionen
dc.subject.meshEmigration and Immigrationen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshModels, Statisticalen
dc.subject.meshMortalityen
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen
dc.subject.meshSudanen
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen
dc.subject.meshUgandaen
dc.titleUsing indirect methods to understand the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality.en
dc.contributor.departmentMEASURE Evaluation, UNC-Chapel Hill, USA.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Biosocial Scienceen
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