Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18278
Title:
Treatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.
Authors:
Lacoux, P; Ford, N
Journal:
Lancet Neurology
Abstract:
During Sierra Leone's violent decade-long war, the warring parties used amputation, especially of arms, as a means of terror. In a camp for amputees in the capital city Freetown, Médecins Sans Frontières established a clinic and a treatment programme for neuropathic pain. Insecurity and cultural and language barriers have complicated this work, but medical and humanitarian benefits have been demonstrated. Pain services are virtually non-existent in less-developed countries. There have recently been no major treatment advances for neuropathic or phantom pain; however, the general body of knowledge about amputation pain can be increased by observations from these difficult settings.
Affiliation:
Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland, UK. office@london.msf.uk
Publisher:
Elsevier
Issue Date:
Jul-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18278
PubMed ID:
12849488
Additional Links:
http://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur
Language:
en
ISSN:
1474-4422
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLacoux, P-
dc.contributor.authorFord, N-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-14T11:41:18Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-14T11:41:18Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07-
dc.identifier.citationTreatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone. 2002, 1 (3):190-5notLancet Neurolen
dc.identifier.issn1474-4422-
dc.identifier.pmid12849488-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18278-
dc.description.abstractDuring Sierra Leone's violent decade-long war, the warring parties used amputation, especially of arms, as a means of terror. In a camp for amputees in the capital city Freetown, Médecins Sans Frontières established a clinic and a treatment programme for neuropathic pain. Insecurity and cultural and language barriers have complicated this work, but medical and humanitarian benefits have been demonstrated. Pain services are virtually non-existent in less-developed countries. There have recently been no major treatment advances for neuropathic or phantom pain; however, the general body of knowledge about amputation pain can be increased by observations from these difficult settings.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/laneur-
dc.rightsReproduced on this site with permission of Elsevier Ltd. Please see www.thelancet.com for further relevant comment.en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAmputation Stumpsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPain Clinicsen
dc.subject.meshPain Measurementen
dc.subject.meshPhantom Limben
dc.subject.meshSierra Leoneen
dc.subject.meshViolenceen
dc.titleTreatment of neuropathic pain in Sierra Leone.en
dc.contributor.departmentNinewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland, UK. office@london.msf.uken
dc.identifier.journalLancet Neurologyen

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