Malaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18922
Title:
Malaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières.
Authors:
Evans, D
Journal:
The Medical Journal of Australia
Abstract:
This is a personal account of my brief time in Burundi as a volunteer doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) at the beginning of 2001. Burundi is a small nation in central Africa (bounded by the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania) which has suffered from problems between the Hutu and Tutsi "ethnic groups", similar to those for which Rwanda is better known. Unlike Rwanda, the war between government troops and rebel forces continues in Burundi. MSF has been in Burundi since 1992, providing basic healthcare, nutrition programs, surgical services and epidemiological intervention. In late 2000, a malaria epidemic began in Burundi's highland regions where transmission is normally low, and thus the population largely not immune. Malnutrition rates also increased and MSF rapidly expanded its usual program in an attempt to control these new health problems.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières, Glebe, NSW. office@sydney.msf.org
Publisher:
Medical Society of Australia
Issue Date:
21-Feb-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/18922
PubMed ID:
11837845
Additional Links:
http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/175_12_171201/evans/evans.html
Language:
en
Description:
To access this article, click on "Additional Links"
ISSN:
0025-729X
Appears in Collections:
Malaria

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEvans, D-
dc.date.accessioned2008-02-21T16:54:32Z-
dc.date.available2008-02-21T16:54:32Z-
dc.date.issued2008-02-21T16:54:32Z-
dc.identifier.citationMalaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières., 175 (11-12):575-6 Med. J. Aust.en
dc.identifier.issn0025-729X-
dc.identifier.pmid11837845-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/18922-
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links"-
dc.description.abstractThis is a personal account of my brief time in Burundi as a volunteer doctor with Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) at the beginning of 2001. Burundi is a small nation in central Africa (bounded by the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania) which has suffered from problems between the Hutu and Tutsi "ethnic groups", similar to those for which Rwanda is better known. Unlike Rwanda, the war between government troops and rebel forces continues in Burundi. MSF has been in Burundi since 1992, providing basic healthcare, nutrition programs, surgical services and epidemiological intervention. In late 2000, a malaria epidemic began in Burundi's highland regions where transmission is normally low, and thus the population largely not immune. Malnutrition rates also increased and MSF rapidly expanded its usual program in an attempt to control these new health problems.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedical Society of Australia-
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/175_12_171201/evans/evans.html-
dc.rightsArchived on this site with thanks to the Medical Society of Australiaen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBurundien
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHospital Volunteersen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMalariaen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMedical Missions, Officialen
dc.subject.meshNutrition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.titleMalaria, malnutrition and MSF. Médecins Sans Frontières.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Glebe, NSW. office@sydney.msf.orgen
dc.identifier.journalThe Medical Journal of Australiaen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.