Could Nutritional Rehabilitation at Home Complement or Replace Centre-based Therapeutic Feeding Programmes for Severe Malnutrition?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/21177
Title:
Could Nutritional Rehabilitation at Home Complement or Replace Centre-based Therapeutic Feeding Programmes for Severe Malnutrition?
Authors:
Gaboulaud, V; Dan-Bouzoua, N; Brasher, C; Fedida, G; Gergonne, B; Brown, V
Journal:
Journal of Tropical Pediatrics
Abstract:
To obtain this article click on "Additional Links"; To measure the success rate of three different strategies used in Médecins Sans Frontières large-scale therapeutic nutritional rehabilitation programme in Niger, we analysed three cohorts of severely malnourished patients in terms of daily weight gain, length of stay, recovery, case fatality and defaulting. A total of 1937 children aged 6-59 months were followed prospectively from 15 August 2002 to 21 October 2003. For the three cohorts, 660 children were maintained in the therapeutic feeding centre (TFC) during the entire treatment, 937 children were initially treated at the TFC and completed treatment at home and 340 children were exclusively treated at home. For all cohorts, average time in the programme and average weight gain met the international standards (30-40 days, >8 g/kg/day). Default rates were 28.1, 16.8 and 5.6% for TFC only, TFC plus home-based and home-based alone strategies, respectively. The overall case fatality rate for the entire programme was 6.8%. Case fatality rates were 18.9% for TFC only and 1.7% for home-based alone. No deaths were recorded in children transferred to rehabilitation at home. This study suggests that satisfactory results for the treatment of severe malnutrition can be achieved using a combination of home and hospital-based strategies.
Affiliation:
Epicentre, Paris, France. vgaboulaud@epicentre.msf.org
Publisher:
Published by Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
Feb-2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/21177
DOI:
10.1093/tropej/fml052
PubMed ID:
17030533
Additional Links:
http://tropej.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/fml052v1; http://tropej.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/53/1/49?ijkey=BsUaqp58Nhfgc&keytype=ref&siteid=tropej
Language:
en
Description:
To access this article, click on "Additional Links"
ISSN:
0142-6338
Appears in Collections:
Nutrition

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGaboulaud, V-
dc.contributor.authorDan-Bouzoua, N-
dc.contributor.authorBrasher, C-
dc.contributor.authorFedida, G-
dc.contributor.authorGergonne, B-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, V-
dc.date.accessioned2008-03-19T14:41:34Z-
dc.date.available2008-03-19T14:41:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007-02-
dc.identifier.citationCould Nutritional Rehabilitation at Home Complement or Replace Centre-based Therapeutic Feeding Programmes for Severe Malnutrition? 2007, 53 (1):49-51 J. Trop. Pediatr.en
dc.identifier.issn0142-6338-
dc.identifier.pmid17030533-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/tropej/fml052-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/21177-
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links"en
dc.description.abstractTo obtain this article click on "Additional Links"-
dc.description.abstractTo measure the success rate of three different strategies used in Médecins Sans Frontières large-scale therapeutic nutritional rehabilitation programme in Niger, we analysed three cohorts of severely malnourished patients in terms of daily weight gain, length of stay, recovery, case fatality and defaulting. A total of 1937 children aged 6-59 months were followed prospectively from 15 August 2002 to 21 October 2003. For the three cohorts, 660 children were maintained in the therapeutic feeding centre (TFC) during the entire treatment, 937 children were initially treated at the TFC and completed treatment at home and 340 children were exclusively treated at home. For all cohorts, average time in the programme and average weight gain met the international standards (30-40 days, >8 g/kg/day). Default rates were 28.1, 16.8 and 5.6% for TFC only, TFC plus home-based and home-based alone strategies, respectively. The overall case fatality rate for the entire programme was 6.8%. Case fatality rates were 18.9% for TFC only and 1.7% for home-based alone. No deaths were recorded in children transferred to rehabilitation at home. This study suggests that satisfactory results for the treatment of severe malnutrition can be achieved using a combination of home and hospital-based strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublished by Oxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://tropej.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/fml052v1-
dc.relation.urlhttp://tropej.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/53/1/49?ijkey=BsUaqp58Nhfgc&keytype=ref&siteid=tropejen
dc.rightsArchived on this site with kind permission from Oxford University Pressen
dc.subject.meshChild Health Servicesen
dc.subject.meshChild Nutrition Disordersen
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHome Care Servicesen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshNigeren
dc.subject.meshNutritional Supporten
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshProtein-Energy Malnutritionen
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleCould Nutritional Rehabilitation at Home Complement or Replace Centre-based Therapeutic Feeding Programmes for Severe Malnutrition?en
dc.contributor.departmentEpicentre, Paris, France. vgaboulaud@epicentre.msf.orgen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Tropical Pediatricsen

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