The use of a mobile laboratory unit in support of patient management and epidemiological surveillance during the 2005 Marburg outbreak in Angola

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/213229
Title:
The use of a mobile laboratory unit in support of patient management and epidemiological surveillance during the 2005 Marburg outbreak in Angola
Authors:
Grolla, Allen; Jones, Steven M.; Fernando, Lisa; Strong, James E.; Ströher, Ute; Möller, Peggy; Paweska, Janusz T.; Burt, Felicity; Pablo Palma, Pedro; Sprecher, Armand; Formenty, Pierre; Roth, Cathy; Feldmann, Heinz
Journal:
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Abstract:
Background: Marburg virus (MARV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic fever in man, has emerged in Angola resulting in the largest outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) with the highest case fatality rate to date. Methodology/Principal Findings: A mobile laboratory unit (MLU) was deployed as part of the World Health Organization outbreak response. Utilizing quantitative real-time PCR assays, this laboratory provided specific MARV diagnostics in Uige, the epicentre of the outbreak. The MLU operated over a period of 88 days and tested 620 specimens from 388 individuals. Specimens included mainly oral swabs and EDTA blood. Following establishing on site, the MLU operation allowed a diagnostic response in ,4 hours from sample receiving. Most cases were found among females in the child-bearing age and in children less than five years of age. The outbreak had a high number of paediatric cases and breastfeeding may have been a factor in MARV transmission as indicated by the epidemiology and MARV positive breast milk specimens. Oral swabs were a useful alternative specimen source to whole blood/serum allowing testing of patients in circumstances of resistance to invasive procedures but limited diagnostic testing to molecular approaches. There was a high concordance in test results between the MLU and the reference laboratory in Luanda operated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Conclusions/Significance: The MLU was an important outbreak response asset providing support in patient management and epidemiological surveillance. Field laboratory capacity should be expanded and made an essential part of any future outbreak investigation.
Affiliation:
Special Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Institut fu¨ r Virologie, Philipps-Universita¨t, Marburg, Hessen, Germany; Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Sandringham, South Africa; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Barcelona, Spain; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Brussels, Belgium; World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Issue Date:
24-May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/213229
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0001183
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001183
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1935-2735
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrolla, Allenen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Steven M.en
dc.contributor.authorFernando, Lisaen
dc.contributor.authorStrong, James E.en
dc.contributor.authorStröher, Uteen
dc.contributor.authorMöller, Peggyen
dc.contributor.authorPaweska, Janusz T.en
dc.contributor.authorBurt, Felicityen
dc.contributor.authorPablo Palma, Pedroen
dc.contributor.authorSprecher, Armanden
dc.contributor.authorFormenty, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorRoth, Cathyen
dc.contributor.authorFeldmann, Heinzen
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-28T05:22:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-02-28T05:22:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-24-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS Negl Trop Dis 2011; 5(5):e1183en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0001183-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/213229-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Marburg virus (MARV), a zoonotic pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic fever in man, has emerged in Angola resulting in the largest outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF) with the highest case fatality rate to date. Methodology/Principal Findings: A mobile laboratory unit (MLU) was deployed as part of the World Health Organization outbreak response. Utilizing quantitative real-time PCR assays, this laboratory provided specific MARV diagnostics in Uige, the epicentre of the outbreak. The MLU operated over a period of 88 days and tested 620 specimens from 388 individuals. Specimens included mainly oral swabs and EDTA blood. Following establishing on site, the MLU operation allowed a diagnostic response in ,4 hours from sample receiving. Most cases were found among females in the child-bearing age and in children less than five years of age. The outbreak had a high number of paediatric cases and breastfeeding may have been a factor in MARV transmission as indicated by the epidemiology and MARV positive breast milk specimens. Oral swabs were a useful alternative specimen source to whole blood/serum allowing testing of patients in circumstances of resistance to invasive procedures but limited diagnostic testing to molecular approaches. There was a high concordance in test results between the MLU and the reference laboratory in Luanda operated by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Conclusions/Significance: The MLU was an important outbreak response asset providing support in patient management and epidemiological surveillance. Field laboratory capacity should be expanded and made an essential part of any future outbreak investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001183en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshMarburg Hemorrhagic Feveren
dc.subject.meshMarburg Virus Diseaseen
dc.titleThe use of a mobile laboratory unit in support of patient management and epidemiological surveillance during the 2005 Marburg outbreak in Angolaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSpecial Pathogens Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Immunology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Institut fu¨ r Virologie, Philipps-Universita¨t, Marburg, Hessen, Germany; Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Sandringham, South Africa; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Barcelona, Spain; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Brussels, Belgium; World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerlanden
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
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