The looming epidemic of diabetes-associated tuberculosis: learning lessons from HIV-associated tuberculosis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/220993
Title:
The looming epidemic of diabetes-associated tuberculosis: learning lessons from HIV-associated tuberculosis
Authors:
Harries, A D; Lin, Y; Satyanarayana, S; Lönnroth, K; Li, L; Wilson, N; Chauhan, L S; Zachariah, R; Baker, M A; Jeon, C Y; Murray, M B; Maher, D; Bygbjerg, I C; Enarson, D A; Billo, N E; Kapur, A
Journal:
International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Abstract:
The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing at a dramatic rate, and countries in Asia, particularly India and China, will bear the brunt of this epidemic. Persons with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of active tuberculosis (TB), which is two to three times higher than in persons without diabetes. In this article, we argue that the epidemiological interactions and the effects on clinical presentation and treatment resulting from the interaction between diabetes and TB are similar to those observed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and TB. The lessons learned from approaches to reduce the dual burden of HIV and TB, and especially the modes of screening for the two diseases, can be adapted and applied to the screening, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diabetes and TB. The new World Health Organization (WHO) and The Union Collaborative Framework for care and control of TB and diabetes has many similarities to the WHO Policy on Collaborative Activities to reduce the dual burden of TB and HIV, and aims to guide policy makers and implementers on how to move forward and combat this looming dual epidemic. The response to the growing HIV-associated TB epidemic in the 1980s and 1990s was slow and uncoordinated, despite clearly articulated warnings about the scale of the forthcoming problem. We must not make the same mistake with diabetes and TB. The Framework provides a template for action, and it is now up to donors, policy makers and implementers to apply the recommendations in the field and to 'learn by doing'.
Affiliation:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; China Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Beijing, China; South-East Asia Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Delhi, India; Stop TB Department, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Clinical Center on Tuberculosis, Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; Clinical Center on Tuberculosis, Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; South-East Asia Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Delhi, India; National Centre for Disease Control, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Delhi, India; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Operational Research Unit, Brussels Operational Center, Luxembourg; Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France; World Diabetes Foundation, Gentofte, Denmark
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/220993
DOI:
10.5588/ijtld.11.0503
PubMed ID:
21902876
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=21902876%20
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1815-7920
Appears in Collections:
TB

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorLin, Yen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSatyanarayana, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLönnroth, Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChauhan, L Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBaker, M Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJeon, C Yen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, M Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorBygbjerg, I Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEnarson, D Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBillo, N Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorKapur, Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-28T00:56:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-28T00:56:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-01-
dc.identifier.citationInt J Tuberc Lung Dis 2011; 15(11):1436-45en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1815-7920-
dc.identifier.pmid21902876-
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/ijtld.11.0503-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/220993-
dc.description.abstractThe prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing at a dramatic rate, and countries in Asia, particularly India and China, will bear the brunt of this epidemic. Persons with diabetes have a significantly increased risk of active tuberculosis (TB), which is two to three times higher than in persons without diabetes. In this article, we argue that the epidemiological interactions and the effects on clinical presentation and treatment resulting from the interaction between diabetes and TB are similar to those observed for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and TB. The lessons learned from approaches to reduce the dual burden of HIV and TB, and especially the modes of screening for the two diseases, can be adapted and applied to the screening, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diabetes and TB. The new World Health Organization (WHO) and The Union Collaborative Framework for care and control of TB and diabetes has many similarities to the WHO Policy on Collaborative Activities to reduce the dual burden of TB and HIV, and aims to guide policy makers and implementers on how to move forward and combat this looming dual epidemic. The response to the growing HIV-associated TB epidemic in the 1980s and 1990s was slow and uncoordinated, despite clearly articulated warnings about the scale of the forthcoming problem. We must not make the same mistake with diabetes and TB. The Framework provides a template for action, and it is now up to donors, policy makers and implementers to apply the recommendations in the field and to 'learn by doing'.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=21902876%20en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB
dc.subject.meshAIDS-Related Opportunistic Infectionsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAntitubercular Agentsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCoinfectionen_GB
dc.subject.meshCooperative Behavioren_GB
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Complicationsen_GB
dc.subject.meshEpidemicsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Policyen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshInternational Cooperationen_GB
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen_GB
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_GB
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshTuberculosisen_GB
dc.subject.meshWorld Healthen_GB
dc.titleThe looming epidemic of diabetes-associated tuberculosis: learning lessons from HIV-associated tuberculosisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; China Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Beijing, China; South-East Asia Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Delhi, India; Stop TB Department, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Clinical Center on Tuberculosis, Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; Clinical Center on Tuberculosis, Chinese Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China; South-East Asia Office, International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Delhi, India; National Centre for Disease Control, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Delhi, India; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Operational Research Unit, Brussels Operational Center, Luxembourg; Division of Infectious Diseases, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, New York; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Global Health Equity, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Department of International Health, Immunology and Microbiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France; World Diabetes Foundation, Gentofte, Denmarken_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB

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