Spatial dynamics of meningococcal meningitis in Niger: observed patterns in comparison with measles

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/242395
Title:
Spatial dynamics of meningococcal meningitis in Niger: observed patterns in comparison with measles
Authors:
Bharti, N; Broutin, H; Grais, R F; Ferrari, M J; Djibo, A; Tatem, A J; Grenfell, B T
Journal:
Epidemiology and Infection
Abstract:
SUMMARYThroughout the African meningitis belt, meningococcal meningitis outbreaks occur only during the dry season. Measles in Niger exhibits similar seasonality, where increased population density during the dry season probably escalates measles transmission. Because meningococcal meningitis and measles are both directly transmitted, we propose that host aggregation also impacts the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. Although climate affects broad meningococcal meningitis seasonality, we focus on the less examined role of human density at a finer spatial scale. By analysing spatial patterns of suspected cases of meningococcal meningitis, we show fewer absences of suspected cases in districts along primary roads, similar to measles fadeouts in the same Nigerien metapopulation. We further show that, following periods during no suspected cases, districts with high reappearance rates of meningococcal meningitis also have high measles reintroduction rates. Despite many biological and epidemiological differences, similar seasonal and spatial patterns emerge from the dynamics of both diseases. This analysis enhances our understanding of spatial patterns and disease transmission and suggests hotspots for infection and potential target areas for meningococcal meningitis surveillance and intervention.
Affiliation:
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Center for Health and Wellbeing, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Princeton NJ, USA; MIVEGEC, UMR CNRS 5290, IRD 224, UM1, UM2, Montpellier, France; Epicentre, Paris, France; Department of Biology, Department of Statistics, and Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Penn State University, PA, USA; Ministry of Health, Niamey, Niger; Emerging Pathogens Institute and Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville FL, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda MD, USA
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Issue Date:
5-Oct-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/242395
DOI:
10.1017/S0950268811002032
PubMed ID:
22009033
Additional Links:
http://www.mmnp-journal.org/action/displayAbstract?aid=8399955&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0950268811002032&fromHTMLView=Y
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1469-4409
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBharti, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBroutin, Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrais, R Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, M Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDjibo, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTatem, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrenfell, B Ten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-10T20:20:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-10T20:20:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-05-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiol Infect 2011; Published ahead of printen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-4409-
dc.identifier.pmid22009033-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0950268811002032-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/242395-
dc.description.abstractSUMMARYThroughout the African meningitis belt, meningococcal meningitis outbreaks occur only during the dry season. Measles in Niger exhibits similar seasonality, where increased population density during the dry season probably escalates measles transmission. Because meningococcal meningitis and measles are both directly transmitted, we propose that host aggregation also impacts the transmission of meningococcal meningitis. Although climate affects broad meningococcal meningitis seasonality, we focus on the less examined role of human density at a finer spatial scale. By analysing spatial patterns of suspected cases of meningococcal meningitis, we show fewer absences of suspected cases in districts along primary roads, similar to measles fadeouts in the same Nigerien metapopulation. We further show that, following periods during no suspected cases, districts with high reappearance rates of meningococcal meningitis also have high measles reintroduction rates. Despite many biological and epidemiological differences, similar seasonal and spatial patterns emerge from the dynamics of both diseases. This analysis enhances our understanding of spatial patterns and disease transmission and suggests hotspots for infection and potential target areas for meningococcal meningitis surveillance and intervention.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mmnp-journal.org/action/displayAbstract?aid=8399955&fulltextType=RA&fileId=S0950268811002032&fromHTMLView=Yen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Epidemiology and Infection and Cambridge University Pressen_GB
dc.subject.meshMeningitis, Meningococcalen_GB
dc.subject.meshMeaslesen_GB
dc.titleSpatial dynamics of meningococcal meningitis in Niger: observed patterns in comparison with measlesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Center for Health and Wellbeing, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Princeton NJ, USA; MIVEGEC, UMR CNRS 5290, IRD 224, UM1, UM2, Montpellier, France; Epicentre, Paris, France; Department of Biology, Department of Statistics, and Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics, Penn State University, PA, USA; Ministry of Health, Niamey, Niger; Emerging Pathogens Institute and Department of Geography, University of Florida, Gainesville FL, USA; Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda MD, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEpidemiology and Infectionen_GB

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