Adherence to HIV post-exposure prophylaxis in victims of sexual assault: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/245351
Title:
Adherence to HIV post-exposure prophylaxis in victims of sexual assault: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors:
Chacko, Liza; Ford, Nathan; Sbaiti, Mariam; Siddiqui, Ruby
Journal:
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Abstract:
ObjectiveTo assess adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for the prevention of HIV infection in victims of sexual assault.MethodsThe authors carried out a systematic review, random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression of studies reporting adherence to PEP among victims of sexual violence. Seven electronic databases were searched. Our primary outcome was adherence; secondary outcomes included defaulting, refusal and side effects.Results2159 titles were screened, and 24 studies matching the inclusion criteria were taken through to analysis. The overall proportion of patients adhering to PEP (23 cohort studies, 2166 patients) was 40.3% (95% CI 32.5% to 48.1%), and the overall proportion of patients defaulting from care (18 cohorts, 1972 patients) was 41.2% (95% CI 31.1% to 51.4%). Adherence appeared to be higher in developing countries compared with developed countries.ConclusionsAdherence to PEP is poor in all settings. Interventions are needed to support adherence.
Affiliation:
Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK; Médecins Sans Frontières, Doctors without Borders (MSF-UK), London, UK; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Issue Date:
13-Feb-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/245351
DOI:
10.1136/sextrans-2011-050371
PubMed ID:
22332148
Additional Links:
http://sti.bmj.com/content/early/2012/02/12/sextrans-2011-050371.short?g=w_sti_ahead_tab
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1472-3263
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChacko, Lizaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFord, Nathanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSbaiti, Mariamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSiddiqui, Rubyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T19:10:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T19:10:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-02-13-
dc.identifier.citationSex Trans Infect 2012; Published ahead of printen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1472-3263-
dc.identifier.pmid22332148-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/sextrans-2011-050371-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/245351-
dc.description.abstractObjectiveTo assess adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for the prevention of HIV infection in victims of sexual assault.MethodsThe authors carried out a systematic review, random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression of studies reporting adherence to PEP among victims of sexual violence. Seven electronic databases were searched. Our primary outcome was adherence; secondary outcomes included defaulting, refusal and side effects.Results2159 titles were screened, and 24 studies matching the inclusion criteria were taken through to analysis. The overall proportion of patients adhering to PEP (23 cohort studies, 2166 patients) was 40.3% (95% CI 32.5% to 48.1%), and the overall proportion of patients defaulting from care (18 cohorts, 1972 patients) was 41.2% (95% CI 31.1% to 51.4%). Adherence appeared to be higher in developing countries compared with developed countries.ConclusionsAdherence to PEP is poor in all settings. Interventions are needed to support adherence.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://sti.bmj.com/content/early/2012/02/12/sextrans-2011-050371.short?g=w_sti_ahead_taben_GB
dc.rightsPublished by BMJ Publishing Group Archived on this site with the kind permission of BMJ Journalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen_GB
dc.titleAdherence to HIV post-exposure prophylaxis in victims of sexual assault: a systematic review and meta-analysisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK; Médecins Sans Frontières, Doctors without Borders (MSF-UK), London, UK; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africaen_GB
dc.identifier.journalSexually Transmitted Infectionsen_GB

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