Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/255371
Title:
Sleeping sickness
Authors:
Malvy, D; Chappuis, F
Journal:
Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Abstract:
Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a vector-borne disease that flourishes in impoverished, rural parts of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei and is transmitted by tsetse flies of the genus Glossina. The majority of cases are caused by T. b. gambiense, which gives rise to the chronic, anthroponotic endemic disease in Western and Central Africa. Infection with T. b. rhodesiense leads to the acute, zoonotic form of Eastern and Southern Africa. The parasites live and multiply extracellularly in the blood and tissue fluids of their human host. They have elaborated a variety of strategies for invading hosts, to escape the immune system and to take advantage of host growth factors. HAT is a challenging and deadly disease owing to its complex epidemiology and clinical presentation and, if left untreated, can result in high death rates. As one of the most neglected tropical diseases, HAT is characterized by the limited availability of safe and cost-effective control tools. No vaccine against HAT is available, and the toxicity of existing old and cumbersome drugs precludes the adoption of control strategies based on preventive chemotherapy. As a result, the keystones of interventions against sleeping sickness are active and passive case-finding for early detection of cases followed by treatment, vector control and animal reservoir management. New methods to diagnose and treat patients and to control transmission by the tsetse fly are needed to achieve the goal of global elimination of the disease.
Affiliation:
Travel Clinics and Division of Tropical Medicine and Imported Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine and Tropical Diseases, University Hospital Centre, Bordeaux, France; Universite de Bordeaux, Faculty of Medicine, INSERM U897 and Centre Rene-Labusquiere (Tropical Medicine Branch), Bordeaux, France; Division of International and Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Operational Centre, Geneva, Switzerland
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Issue Date:
4-Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/255371
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03536.x
PubMed ID:
21722252
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03536.x/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Artyicle approval pending
ISSN:
1469-0691
Appears in Collections:
Trypanosomiasis/Sleeping Sickness

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMalvy, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorChappuis, Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-11T23:28:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-11T23:28:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-04-
dc.identifier.citationClin Microbiol Infect 2011; 17(7):986-95en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1469-0691-
dc.identifier.pmid21722252-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03536.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/255371-
dc.descriptionArtyicle approval pending-
dc.description.abstractHuman African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a vector-borne disease that flourishes in impoverished, rural parts of sub-Saharan Africa. It is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei and is transmitted by tsetse flies of the genus Glossina. The majority of cases are caused by T. b. gambiense, which gives rise to the chronic, anthroponotic endemic disease in Western and Central Africa. Infection with T. b. rhodesiense leads to the acute, zoonotic form of Eastern and Southern Africa. The parasites live and multiply extracellularly in the blood and tissue fluids of their human host. They have elaborated a variety of strategies for invading hosts, to escape the immune system and to take advantage of host growth factors. HAT is a challenging and deadly disease owing to its complex epidemiology and clinical presentation and, if left untreated, can result in high death rates. As one of the most neglected tropical diseases, HAT is characterized by the limited availability of safe and cost-effective control tools. No vaccine against HAT is available, and the toxicity of existing old and cumbersome drugs precludes the adoption of control strategies based on preventive chemotherapy. As a result, the keystones of interventions against sleeping sickness are active and passive case-finding for early detection of cases followed by treatment, vector control and animal reservoir management. New methods to diagnose and treat patients and to control transmission by the tsetse fly are needed to achieve the goal of global elimination of the disease.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1469-0691.2011.03536.x/abstracten_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshAfrica South of the Saharaen_GB
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_GB
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Disease Controlen_GB
dc.subject.meshDisease Vectorsen_GB
dc.subject.meshHumansen_GB
dc.subject.meshNeglected Diseasesen_GB
dc.subject.meshTrypanosoma brucei bruceien_GB
dc.subject.meshTrypanosomiasis, Africanen_GB
dc.subject.meshTsetse Fliesen_GB
dc.titleSleeping sicknessen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTravel Clinics and Division of Tropical Medicine and Imported Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine and Tropical Diseases, University Hospital Centre, Bordeaux, France; Universite de Bordeaux, Faculty of Medicine, INSERM U897 and Centre Rene-Labusquiere (Tropical Medicine Branch), Bordeaux, France; Division of International and Humanitarian Medicine, Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Operational Centre, Geneva, Switzerlanden_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical Microbiology and Infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseasesen_GB

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