Reasons for unsatisfactory acceptance of antiretroviral treatment in the urban Kibera slum, Kenya.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/25772
Title:
Reasons for unsatisfactory acceptance of antiretroviral treatment in the urban Kibera slum, Kenya.
Authors:
Unge, C; Johansson, A; Zachariah, R; Some, D; Van Engelgem, I; Ekstrom, A M
Journal:
AIDS Care
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to explore why patients in the urban Kibera slum, Nairobi, Kenya, offered free antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the Médecins Sans Frontièrs (MSF) clinic, choose not to be treated despite signs of AIDS. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients, 9 men and 17 women. Six main reasons emerged for not accepting ART: a) fear of taking medication on an empty stomach due to lack of food; b) fear that side-effects associated with ART would make one more ill; c) fear of disclosure and its possible negative repercussions; d) concern for continuity of treatment and care; e) conflicting information from religious leaders and community, and seeking alternative care (e.g. traditional medicine); f) illiteracy making patients unable to understand the information given by health workers.
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. christianunge@gmail.com
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Issue Date:
Feb-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/25772
DOI:
10.1080/09540120701513677
PubMed ID:
18293122
Additional Links:
http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0954-0121&volume=20&issue=2&spage=146
Language:
en
Description:
To access this article, click on "Additional Links" and follow the publisher's instructions for a free version.; To Access this article, click on "Additional Links".
ISSN:
0954-0121
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorUnge, C-
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, A-
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, R-
dc.contributor.authorSome, D-
dc.contributor.authorVan Engelgem, I-
dc.contributor.authorEkstrom, A M-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-13T13:07:52Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-13T13:07:52Z-
dc.date.issued2008-02-
dc.identifier.citationReasons for unsatisfactory acceptance of antiretroviral treatment in the urban Kibera slum, Kenya. 2008, 20 (2):146-9notAIDS Careen
dc.identifier.issn0954-0121-
dc.identifier.pmid18293122-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09540120701513677-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/25772-
dc.descriptionTo access this article, click on "Additional Links" and follow the publisher's instructions for a free version.-
dc.descriptionTo Access this article, click on "Additional Links".en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to explore why patients in the urban Kibera slum, Nairobi, Kenya, offered free antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the Médecins Sans Frontièrs (MSF) clinic, choose not to be treated despite signs of AIDS. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients, 9 men and 17 women. Six main reasons emerged for not accepting ART: a) fear of taking medication on an empty stomach due to lack of food; b) fear that side-effects associated with ART would make one more ill; c) fear of disclosure and its possible negative repercussions; d) concern for continuity of treatment and care; e) conflicting information from religious leaders and community, and seeking alternative care (e.g. traditional medicine); f) illiteracy making patients unable to understand the information given by health workers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0954-0121&volume=20&issue=2&spage=146en
dc.rightsFree access to this article was provided by kind permission of Taylor & Francisen
dc.titleReasons for unsatisfactory acceptance of antiretroviral treatment in the urban Kibera slum, Kenya.en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. christianunge@gmail.comen
dc.identifier.journalAIDS Careen

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