Self-immolation a common suicidal behaviour in eastern Sri Lanka.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/25954
Title:
Self-immolation a common suicidal behaviour in eastern Sri Lanka.
Authors:
Laloë, V; Ganesan, M
Journal:
Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Abstract:
A high number of self-burning injuries are noted in Batticaloa. The epidemiology, outcome and psychosocial aspects of 87 patients admitted with such burns over a 2-year-period was studied. The patients were compared with accidental burns and patients using other methods of suicide. Seventy nine percent of the victims were females and 72% were in the 15-34 years age-group. Most had marital problems. The majority were Tamils, but Muslims were fairly well represented. The median extent of burn was 48% of total body surface area (TBSA), with the top of the body mainly affected. The use of fire proved to have a high mortality in a group of patients who did not really want to die; 61 (70%) died. Mortality was higher than for accidental burns after matching for age and burn extent. The survivors had long hospital stays and suffered severe disfigurement. The cases where the patient denied self-harm, but in which the injuries were suggestive of this motive, were strikingly similar in age, sex and burn extent to the suicide group. In contrast, poison suicide records showed a male predominance and a gross under-representation of Muslims. Fire is a very significant method of suicide in our area. Social make-up and poor problem-solving ability may be contributing factors.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières, 50 Lady Manning Drive, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. veronique.laloe@bigfoot.com
Publisher:
Elsevier
Issue Date:
Aug-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/25954
PubMed ID:
12163288
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03054179
Language:
en
ISSN:
0305-4179
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaloë, V-
dc.contributor.authorGanesan, M-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-14T10:57:35Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-14T10:57:35Z-
dc.date.issued2002-08-
dc.identifier.citationSelf-immolation a common suicidal behaviour in eastern Sri Lanka. 2002, 28 (5):475-80notBurnsen
dc.identifier.issn0305-4179-
dc.identifier.pmid12163288-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/25954-
dc.description.abstractA high number of self-burning injuries are noted in Batticaloa. The epidemiology, outcome and psychosocial aspects of 87 patients admitted with such burns over a 2-year-period was studied. The patients were compared with accidental burns and patients using other methods of suicide. Seventy nine percent of the victims were females and 72% were in the 15-34 years age-group. Most had marital problems. The majority were Tamils, but Muslims were fairly well represented. The median extent of burn was 48% of total body surface area (TBSA), with the top of the body mainly affected. The use of fire proved to have a high mortality in a group of patients who did not really want to die; 61 (70%) died. Mortality was higher than for accidental burns after matching for age and burn extent. The survivors had long hospital stays and suffered severe disfigurement. The cases where the patient denied self-harm, but in which the injuries were suggestive of this motive, were strikingly similar in age, sex and burn extent to the suicide group. In contrast, poison suicide records showed a male predominance and a gross under-representation of Muslims. Fire is a very significant method of suicide in our area. Social make-up and poor problem-solving ability may be contributing factors.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03054179en
dc.rightsArchived on this site by kind permission and copyright of 2002 by Elsevieren
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen
dc.subject.meshBurnsen
dc.subject.meshFamily Relationsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLength of Stayen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshOutcome Assessment (Health Care)en
dc.subject.meshSelf-Injurious Behavioren
dc.subject.meshSri Lankaen
dc.subject.meshSuicide, Attempteden
dc.subject.meshTrauma Severity Indicesen
dc.titleSelf-immolation a common suicidal behaviour in eastern Sri Lanka.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, 50 Lady Manning Drive, Batticaloa, Sri Lanka. veronique.laloe@bigfoot.comen
dc.identifier.journalBurns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuriesen

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