Epidemiology and mortality of burns in a general hospital of Eastern Sri Lanka.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/26914
Title:
Epidemiology and mortality of burns in a general hospital of Eastern Sri Lanka.
Authors:
Laloë, V
Journal:
Burns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Abstract:
This 2-year prospective study examined the epidemiology and mortality of 345 patients admitted with burn injuries. Sixty-four percent of all burns were accidental in nature and at least 25% were self-inflicted. The rest were due to assaults or had a doubtful cause. The median age was 22 years. Forty-one percent of the accidents were due to the fall of a homemade kerosene bottle lamp. The main cause was flames, followed by scalds. Females outnumbered males in all categories of burns except cases of assault, and suffered from a higher mortality. Most at risk of accidental burns were children between 1 and 4 years, who suffered primarily from scalds. Self-inflicted burns were most common among women aged 20-29 years. The overall median total body surface area (TBSA) burned was 16%. Self-inflicted and 'doubtful' burns were much more extensive and more often fatal than accidental ones. The overall mortality rate was 27%. Burns involving more than 50% of the body surface area were invariably fatal. Mortality was highest in the elderly and in the 20-29 years age group. Burns were the first single cause of mortality in the surgical wards. The case is made for the establishment of more Burns Units.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. veronique.laloe@bigfoot.com
Publisher:
Elsevier
Issue Date:
Dec-2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/26914
PubMed ID:
12464477
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03054179
Language:
en
ISSN:
0305-4179
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaloë, V-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T08:31:41Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-20T08:31:41Z-
dc.date.issued2002-12-
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology and mortality of burns in a general hospital of Eastern Sri Lanka. 2002, 28 (8):778-81notBurnsen
dc.identifier.issn0305-4179-
dc.identifier.pmid12464477-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/26914-
dc.description.abstractThis 2-year prospective study examined the epidemiology and mortality of 345 patients admitted with burn injuries. Sixty-four percent of all burns were accidental in nature and at least 25% were self-inflicted. The rest were due to assaults or had a doubtful cause. The median age was 22 years. Forty-one percent of the accidents were due to the fall of a homemade kerosene bottle lamp. The main cause was flames, followed by scalds. Females outnumbered males in all categories of burns except cases of assault, and suffered from a higher mortality. Most at risk of accidental burns were children between 1 and 4 years, who suffered primarily from scalds. Self-inflicted burns were most common among women aged 20-29 years. The overall median total body surface area (TBSA) burned was 16%. Self-inflicted and 'doubtful' burns were much more extensive and more often fatal than accidental ones. The overall mortality rate was 27%. Burns involving more than 50% of the body surface area were invariably fatal. Mortality was highest in the elderly and in the 20-29 years age group. Burns were the first single cause of mortality in the surgical wards. The case is made for the establishment of more Burns Units.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03054179en
dc.rightsArchived on this site by kind permission and copyright of 2002 by Elsevieren
dc.subject.meshAccidental Fallsen
dc.subject.meshAccidents, Homeen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshBurnsen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHospital Mortalityen
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Generalen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen
dc.subject.meshSelf-Injurious Behavioren
dc.subject.meshSex Distributionen
dc.subject.meshSri Lankaen
dc.subject.meshViolenceen
dc.titleEpidemiology and mortality of burns in a general hospital of Eastern Sri Lanka.en
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. veronique.laloe@bigfoot.comen
dc.identifier.journalBurns : Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuriesen

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