Human African trypanosomiasis amongst urban residents in Kinshasa: a case-control study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/28619
Title:
Human African trypanosomiasis amongst urban residents in Kinshasa: a case-control study.
Authors:
Robays, J; Ebeja, A; Lutumba, P; Miaka mia Bilenge, C; Kande Betu Ku Mesu, V; De Deken, R; Makabuza, J; Deguerry, M; Van der Stuyft, P; Boelaert, M
Journal:
Tropical Medicine & International Health
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) cases have been reported in urban residents of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic Congo since 1996. We set up a case-control study to identify risk factors for the disease. METHODS: All residents of the urban part of Kinshasa with parasitologically confirmed HAT and presenting for treatment to the city's specialized HAT clinics between 1 August, 2002 and 28 February, 2003 were included as cases. We defined the urban part as the area with contiguous habitation and a population density >5000 inhabitants per square kilometre. A digital map of the area was drawn based on a satellite image. For each case, two serologically negative controls were selected, matched on age, sex and neighbourhood. Logistic regression models were fitted to control for confounding. RESULTS: The following risk factors were independently associated with HAT: travel, commerce and cultivating fields in Bandundu, and commerce and cultivating fields in the rural part of Kinshasa. No association with activities in the city itself was found. DISCUSSION: In 2002, the emergence of HAT in urban residents of Kinshasa appears mainly linked to disease transmission in Bandundu and rural Kinshasa. We recommend to intensify control of these foci, to target HAT screening in urban residents to people with contact with these foci, to increase awareness of HAT amongst health workers in the urban health structures and to strengthen disease surveillance.
Affiliation:
Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. jrobays@itg.be
Issue Date:
Aug-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/28619
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01266.x
PubMed ID:
15303991
Language:
en
ISSN:
1360-2276
Appears in Collections:
Trypanosomiasis/Sleeping Sickness

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRobays, J-
dc.contributor.authorEbeja, A-
dc.contributor.authorLutumba, P-
dc.contributor.authorMiaka mia Bilenge, C-
dc.contributor.authorKande Betu Ku Mesu, V-
dc.contributor.authorDe Deken, R-
dc.contributor.authorMakabuza, J-
dc.contributor.authorDeguerry, M-
dc.contributor.authorVan der Stuyft, P-
dc.contributor.authorBoelaert, M-
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-28T13:56:33Z-
dc.date.available2008-05-28T13:56:33Z-
dc.date.issued2004-08-
dc.identifier.citationHuman African trypanosomiasis amongst urban residents in Kinshasa: a case-control study. 2004, 9 (8):869-75 Trop. Med. Int. Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1360-2276-
dc.identifier.pmid15303991-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3156.2004.01266.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/28619-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Increasing numbers of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) cases have been reported in urban residents of Kinshasa, Democratic Republic Congo since 1996. We set up a case-control study to identify risk factors for the disease. METHODS: All residents of the urban part of Kinshasa with parasitologically confirmed HAT and presenting for treatment to the city's specialized HAT clinics between 1 August, 2002 and 28 February, 2003 were included as cases. We defined the urban part as the area with contiguous habitation and a population density >5000 inhabitants per square kilometre. A digital map of the area was drawn based on a satellite image. For each case, two serologically negative controls were selected, matched on age, sex and neighbourhood. Logistic regression models were fitted to control for confounding. RESULTS: The following risk factors were independently associated with HAT: travel, commerce and cultivating fields in Bandundu, and commerce and cultivating fields in the rural part of Kinshasa. No association with activities in the city itself was found. DISCUSSION: In 2002, the emergence of HAT in urban residents of Kinshasa appears mainly linked to disease transmission in Bandundu and rural Kinshasa. We recommend to intensify control of these foci, to target HAT screening in urban residents to people with contact with these foci, to increase awareness of HAT amongst health workers in the urban health structures and to strengthen disease surveillance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived on this site with the kind permission of Wiley-Blackwell, [url]http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/tmi[/url]en
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgricultural Workers' Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCongoen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshTravelen
dc.subject.meshTrypanosomiasis, Africanen
dc.subject.meshUrban Healthen
dc.titleHuman African trypanosomiasis amongst urban residents in Kinshasa: a case-control study.en
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium. jrobays@itg.been
dc.identifier.journalTropical Medicine & International Healthen
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