Mother to Mother (M2M) peer support for women in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programmes: a qualitative study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/295275
Title:
Mother to Mother (M2M) peer support for women in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programmes: a qualitative study
Authors:
Shroufi, Amir; Mafara, Emma; Saint-Sauveur, Jean François; Taziwa, Fabian; Viñoles, Mari Carmen
Journal:
PLoS ONE
Abstract:
Introduction Mother-to-Mother (M2M) or “Mentor Mother” programmes utilise HIV positive mothers to provide support and advice to HIV positive pregnant women and mothers of HIV exposed babies. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supported a Mentor Mother programme in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe from 2009 to 2012; with programme beneficiaries observed to have far higher retention at 6–8 weeks (99% vs 50%, p<0.0005) and to have higher adherence to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) guidelines, compared to those not opting in. In this study we explore how the M2M progamme may have contributed to these findings. Methods In this qualitative study we used thematic analysis of in-depth interviews (n = 79). This study was conducted in 2 urban districts of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second largest city. Results Interviews were completed by 14 mentor mothers, 10 mentor mother family members, 30 beneficiaries (women enrolled both in PMTCT and M2M), 10 beneficiary family members, 5 women enrolled in PMTCT but who had declined to take part in the M2M programme and 10 health care staff members. All beneficiaries and health care staff reported that the programme had improved retention and provided rich information on how this was achieved. Additionally respondents described how the programme had helped bring about beneficial behaviour change. Conclusions M2M programmes offer great potential to empower communities affected by HIV to catalyse positive behaviour change. Our results illustrate how M2M involvement may increase retention in PMTCT programmes. Non-disclosure to one’s partner, as well as some cultural practices prevalent in Zimbabwe appear to be major barriers to participation in M2M programmes.
Affiliation:
Médecins Sans Frontières, Operational Centre Barcelona-Athens, Belgravia, Harare, Zimbabwe
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Issue Date:
5-Jun-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/295275
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0064717
Additional Links:
http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0064717
Submitted date:
2013-06-24
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorShroufi, Amiren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMafara, Emmaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSaint-Sauveur, Jean Françoisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaziwa, Fabianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorViñoles, Mari Carmenen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-04T21:04:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-04T21:04:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-05-
dc.date.submitted2013-06-24-
dc.identifier.citationMother to Mother (M2M) peer support for women in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programmes: a qualitative study 2013, 8 (6):e64717 PLoS ONEen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0064717-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/295275-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Mother-to-Mother (M2M) or “Mentor Mother” programmes utilise HIV positive mothers to provide support and advice to HIV positive pregnant women and mothers of HIV exposed babies. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) supported a Mentor Mother programme in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe from 2009 to 2012; with programme beneficiaries observed to have far higher retention at 6–8 weeks (99% vs 50%, p<0.0005) and to have higher adherence to Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) guidelines, compared to those not opting in. In this study we explore how the M2M progamme may have contributed to these findings. Methods In this qualitative study we used thematic analysis of in-depth interviews (n = 79). This study was conducted in 2 urban districts of Bulawayo, Zimbabwe’s second largest city. Results Interviews were completed by 14 mentor mothers, 10 mentor mother family members, 30 beneficiaries (women enrolled both in PMTCT and M2M), 10 beneficiary family members, 5 women enrolled in PMTCT but who had declined to take part in the M2M programme and 10 health care staff members. All beneficiaries and health care staff reported that the programme had improved retention and provided rich information on how this was achieved. Additionally respondents described how the programme had helped bring about beneficial behaviour change. Conclusions M2M programmes offer great potential to empower communities affected by HIV to catalyse positive behaviour change. Our results illustrate how M2M involvement may increase retention in PMTCT programmes. Non-disclosure to one’s partner, as well as some cultural practices prevalent in Zimbabwe appear to be major barriers to participation in M2M programmes.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0064717en_GB
dc.rightsPublished by Public Library of Science, [url]http://www.plosone.org/[/url] Archived on this site by Open Access permissionen_GB
dc.subjectHIV/AIDSen_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Care/Women's Healthen_GB
dc.subjectModels of Careen_GB
dc.titleMother to Mother (M2M) peer support for women in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programmes: a qualitative studyen
dc.contributor.departmentMédecins Sans Frontières, Operational Centre Barcelona-Athens, Belgravia, Harare, Zimbabween_GB
dc.identifier.journalPLoS ONEen_GB
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