Should mortality data for the elderly be collected routinely in emergencies? The practical challenges of age-disaggregated surveillance systems

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/303532
Title:
Should mortality data for the elderly be collected routinely in emergencies? The practical challenges of age-disaggregated surveillance systems
Authors:
du Cros, P; Venis, S; Karunakara, U
Journal:
Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Abstract:
Data on the elderly are rarely collected in humanitarian emergencies. During a refugee crisis in South Sudan, Médecins Sans Frontières developed a prospective mortality surveillance system collecting data for those aged ≥50 years and found that the elderly were dying at five times the rate of those aged 5-49 years. Practical and ethical issues arose. Were reported ages accurate? Since no baseline exists, what does the mortality rate mean? Should programmatic changes be made without evidence that these would reduce the elderly mortality rate? We outline issues to be addressed to enable informed decisions on response to elderly populations in emergency settings.
Affiliation:
Manson Unit, Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/303532
DOI:
10.1093/trstmh/trt085
PubMed ID:
24114674
Language:
en
ISSN:
1878-3503
Appears in Collections:
Research Methods

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authordu Cros, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVenis, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKarunakara, Uen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-16T22:37:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-16T22:37:00Z-
dc.date.issued2013-11-
dc.identifier.citationShould mortality data for the elderly be collected routinely in emergencies? The practical challenges of age-disaggregated surveillance systems. 2013, 107 (11):669-671 Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-3503-
dc.identifier.pmid24114674-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/trstmh/trt085-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/303532-
dc.description.abstractData on the elderly are rarely collected in humanitarian emergencies. During a refugee crisis in South Sudan, Médecins Sans Frontières developed a prospective mortality surveillance system collecting data for those aged ≥50 years and found that the elderly were dying at five times the rate of those aged 5-49 years. Practical and ethical issues arose. Were reported ages accurate? Since no baseline exists, what does the mortality rate mean? Should programmatic changes be made without evidence that these would reduce the elderly mortality rate? We outline issues to be addressed to enable informed decisions on response to elderly populations in emergency settings.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.rightsPublished by Elsevier Archived on this site with the kind permission of Elsevier Ltd. ([url]http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00359203[/url]) and the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene ([url]http://www.rstmh.org/transactions.asp[/url])en_GB
dc.subjectOperational Researchen_GB
dc.subjectOtheren_GB
dc.titleShould mortality data for the elderly be collected routinely in emergencies? The practical challenges of age-disaggregated surveillance systemsen
dc.contributor.departmentManson Unit, Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalTransactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_GB
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