Reaching Hard-to-Reach Individuals: Nonselective Versus Targeted Outbreak Response Vaccination for Measles

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/306081
Title:
Reaching Hard-to-Reach Individuals: Nonselective Versus Targeted Outbreak Response Vaccination for Measles
Authors:
Minetti, A; Hurtado, N; Grais, R; Ferrari, M
Journal:
American Journal of Epidemiology
Abstract:
Current mass vaccination campaigns in measles outbreak response are nonselective with respect to the immune status of individuals. However, the heterogeneity in immunity, due to previous vaccination coverage or infection, may lead to potential bias of such campaigns toward those with previous high access to vaccination and may result in a lower-than-expected effective impact. During the 2010 measles outbreak in Malawi, only 3 of the 8 districts where vaccination occurred achieved a measureable effective campaign impact (i.e., a reduction in measles cases in the targeted age groups greater than that observed in nonvaccinated districts). Simulation models suggest that selective campaigns targeting hard-to-reach individuals are of greater benefit, particularly in highly vaccinated populations, even for low target coverage and with late implementation. However, the choice between targeted and nonselective campaigns should be context specific, achieving a reasonable balance of feasibility, cost, and expected impact. In addition, it is critical to develop operational strategies to identify and target hard-to-reach individuals.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
16-Oct-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/306081
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwt236
PubMed ID:
24131555
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-6256
Appears in Collections:
Vaccination

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMinetti, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHurtado, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-01T10:01:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-12-01T10:01:15Z-
dc.date.issued2013-10-16-
dc.identifier.citationReaching Hard-to-Reach Individuals: Nonselective Versus Targeted Outbreak Response Vaccination for Measles. 2013: Am. J. Epidemiol.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1476-6256-
dc.identifier.pmid24131555-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwt236-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/306081-
dc.description.abstractCurrent mass vaccination campaigns in measles outbreak response are nonselective with respect to the immune status of individuals. However, the heterogeneity in immunity, due to previous vaccination coverage or infection, may lead to potential bias of such campaigns toward those with previous high access to vaccination and may result in a lower-than-expected effective impact. During the 2010 measles outbreak in Malawi, only 3 of the 8 districts where vaccination occurred achieved a measureable effective campaign impact (i.e., a reduction in measles cases in the targeted age groups greater than that observed in nonvaccinated districts). Simulation models suggest that selective campaigns targeting hard-to-reach individuals are of greater benefit, particularly in highly vaccinated populations, even for low target coverage and with late implementation. However, the choice between targeted and nonselective campaigns should be context specific, achieving a reasonable balance of feasibility, cost, and expected impact. In addition, it is critical to develop operational strategies to identify and target hard-to-reach individuals.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to American Journal of Epidemiology's Open Access agreementen_GB
dc.subjectMeaslesen_GB
dc.subjectOutbreaksen_GB
dc.subjectVaccinationen_GB
dc.titleReaching Hard-to-Reach Individuals: Nonselective Versus Targeted Outbreak Response Vaccination for Measlesen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen_GB

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