Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers' Experiences and Preferences

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/315022
Title:
Clinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers' Experiences and Preferences
Authors:
Bühler, Silja; Roddy, Paul; Nolte, Ellen; Borchert, Matthias
Journal:
Viruses
Abstract:
Understanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.
Publisher:
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/315022
DOI:
10.3390/v6020927
PubMed ID:
24556792
Language:
en
ISSN:
1999-4915
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBühler, Siljaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoddy, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNolte, Ellenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBorchert, Matthiasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-31T21:06:18Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-31T21:06:18Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers' Experiences and Preferences. 2014, 6 (2):927-37 Virusesen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1999-4915-
dc.identifier.pmid24556792-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/v6020927-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/315022-
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding human filovirus hemorrhagic fever (FHF) clinical manifestations and evaluating treatment strategies require the collection of clinical data in outbreak settings, where clinical documentation has been limited. Currently, no consensus among filovirus outbreak-response organisations guides best practice for clinical documentation and data transfer. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with health care workers (HCWs) involved in FHF outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa, and with HCWs experienced in documenting and transferring data from high-risk areas (isolation wards or biosafety level 4 laboratories). Methods for data documentation and transfer were identified, described in detail and categorised by requirement for electricity and ranked by interviewee preference. Some methods involve removing paperwork and other objects from the filovirus disease ward without disinfection. We believe that if done properly, these methods are reasonably safe for certain settings. However, alternative methods avoiding the removal of objects, or involving the removal of paperwork or objects after non-damaging disinfection, are available. These methods are not only safer, they are also perceived as safer and likely more acceptable to health workers and members of the community. The use of standardised clinical forms is overdue. Experiments with by sunlight disinfection should continue, and non-damaging disinfection of impregnated paper, suitable tablet computers and underwater cameras should be evaluated under field conditions.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AG, Basel, Switzerlanden_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Virusesen_GB
dc.subjectOutbreaksen_GB
dc.subjectModels of Careen_GB
dc.titleClinical Documentation and Data Transfer from Ebola and Marburg Virus Disease Wards in Outbreak Settings: Health Care Workers' Experiences and Preferencesen
dc.identifier.journalVirusesen_GB

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