Do non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/315048
Title:
Do non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?
Authors:
Khogali, M; Zachariah, R; Reid, A J; Alipon, S C; Zimble, S; Gbane, M; Etienne, W; Veerman, R; Hassan, A; Harries, A D
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
In a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap,a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/315048
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Womens/Reproductive Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhogali, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorReid, A Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlipon, S Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZimble, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGbane, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorEtienne, Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVeerman, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHassan, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-31T21:27:40Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-31T21:27:40Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-
dc.identifier.citationPHA 2014; 4(1): 12-14en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/315048-
dc.description.abstractIn a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap,a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen_GB
dc.subjectMaternal Care/Women's Healthen_GB
dc.subjectOperational Researchen_GB
dc.titleDo non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen_GB
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