Vaccination in humanitarian crises: satisficing should no longer suffice

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/337108
Title:
Vaccination in humanitarian crises: satisficing should no longer suffice
Authors:
Grais, Rebecca F; Juan-Giner, Aitana
Journal:
International Health
Abstract:
There are more possible vaccination interventions to mitigate the adverse health consequences of populations in crises than ever before, but recent reviews suggest delivering these vaccines has been fraught with difficulty. The decision to implement vaccination interventions in crises remains, more often than not, an exercise in satisficing. The sparse credible epidemiologic and effectiveness data in populations affected by crises contributes greatly to decision-making difficulty, as do the limits of vaccine presentations, formulations and storage. Political considerations and lack of decision-making guidance contribute further. Moving forward requires sound effectiveness studies to help ensure that decision-making is based to the degree possible on substance.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
4-Aug-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/337108
DOI:
10.1093/inthealth/ihu051
PubMed ID:
25091023
Language:
en
ISSN:
1876-3405
Appears in Collections:
Vaccination

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Rebecca Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJuan-Giner, Aitanaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-11T22:34:39Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-11T22:34:39Z-
dc.date.issued2014-08-04-
dc.identifier.citationVaccination in humanitarian crises: satisficing should no longer suffice. 2014: Int Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1876-3405-
dc.identifier.pmid25091023-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/inthealth/ihu051-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/337108-
dc.description.abstractThere are more possible vaccination interventions to mitigate the adverse health consequences of populations in crises than ever before, but recent reviews suggest delivering these vaccines has been fraught with difficulty. The decision to implement vaccination interventions in crises remains, more often than not, an exercise in satisficing. The sparse credible epidemiologic and effectiveness data in populations affected by crises contributes greatly to decision-making difficulty, as do the limits of vaccine presentations, formulations and storage. Political considerations and lack of decision-making guidance contribute further. Moving forward requires sound effectiveness studies to help ensure that decision-making is based to the degree possible on substance.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.rightsArchived on this site with kind permission of Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_GB
dc.subjectVaccinationen_GB
dc.titleVaccination in humanitarian crises: satisficing should no longer sufficeen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Healthen_GB
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