Transmission of ebola viruses: what we know and what we do not know

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/347026
Title:
Transmission of ebola viruses: what we know and what we do not know
Authors:
Osterholm, Michael T; Moore, Kristine A; Kelley, Nicholas S; Brosseau, Lisa M; Wong, Gary; Murphy, Frederick A; Peters, Clarence J; LeDuc, James W; Russell, Phillip K; Van Herp, Michel; Kapetshi, Jimmy; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques T; Ilunga, Benoit Kebela; Strong, James E; Grolla, Allen; Wolz, Anja; Kargbo, Brima; Kargbo, David K; Formenty, Pierre; Sanders, David Avram; Kobinger, Gary P
Journal:
mBio
Abstract:
Available evidence demonstrates that direct patient contact and contact with infectious body fluids are the primary modes for Ebola virus transmission, but this is based on a limited number of studies. Key areas requiring further study include (i) the role of aerosol transmission (either via large droplets or small particles in the vicinity of source patients), (ii) the role of environmental contamination and fomite transmission, (iii) the degree to which minimally or mildly ill persons transmit infection, (iv) how long clinically relevant infectiousness persists, (v) the role that "superspreading events" may play in driving transmission dynamics, (vi) whether strain differences or repeated serial passage in outbreak settings can impact virus transmission, and (vii) what role sylvatic or domestic animals could play in outbreak propagation, particularly during major epidemics such as the 2013-2015 West Africa situation. In this review, we address what we know and what we do not know about Ebola virus transmission. We also hypothesize that Ebola viruses have the potential to be respiratory pathogens with primary respiratory spread.
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Issue Date:
19-Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/347026
DOI:
10.1128/mBio.00137-15
PubMed ID:
25698835
Language:
en
ISSN:
2150-7511
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOsterholm, Michael Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Kristine Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelley, Nicholas Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrosseau, Lisa Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorWong, Garyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Frederick Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Clarence Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeDuc, James Wen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Phillip Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorVan Herp, Michelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKapetshi, Jimmyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMuyembe, Jean-Jacques Ten_GB
dc.contributor.authorIlunga, Benoit Kebelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStrong, James Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrolla, Allenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWolz, Anjaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKargbo, Brimaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKargbo, David Ken_GB
dc.contributor.authorFormenty, Pierreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSanders, David Avramen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKobinger, Gary Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-23T19:26:06Z-
dc.date.available2015-03-23T19:26:06Z-
dc.date.issued2015-02-19-
dc.identifier.citationTransmission of ebola viruses: what we know and what we do not know. 2015, 6 (2): MBioen_GB
dc.identifier.issn2150-7511-
dc.identifier.pmid25698835-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/mBio.00137-15-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/347026-
dc.description.abstractAvailable evidence demonstrates that direct patient contact and contact with infectious body fluids are the primary modes for Ebola virus transmission, but this is based on a limited number of studies. Key areas requiring further study include (i) the role of aerosol transmission (either via large droplets or small particles in the vicinity of source patients), (ii) the role of environmental contamination and fomite transmission, (iii) the degree to which minimally or mildly ill persons transmit infection, (iv) how long clinically relevant infectiousness persists, (v) the role that "superspreading events" may play in driving transmission dynamics, (vi) whether strain differences or repeated serial passage in outbreak settings can impact virus transmission, and (vii) what role sylvatic or domestic animals could play in outbreak propagation, particularly during major epidemics such as the 2013-2015 West Africa situation. In this review, we address what we know and what we do not know about Ebola virus transmission. We also hypothesize that Ebola viruses have the potential to be respiratory pathogens with primary respiratory spread.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiologyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to mBioen_GB
dc.titleTransmission of ebola viruses: what we know and what we do not knowen
dc.identifier.journalmBioen_GB

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.