MSF Field Research > 1 Published Research and Commentary > Pharmacy > Substandard medicines in resource-poor settings: A problem that can no longer be ignored

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10144/37334
    Del.icio.us     LinkedIn     Citeulike     Connotea     Facebook     Stumble it!


Download this article:
View/Open File Description Size Format
Thumbnail
View/Open
Caudron_substdmeds_TMIH2008.pdfMain article83KbAdobe PDF

Title: Substandard medicines in resource-poor settings: A problem that can no longer be ignored
Authors: Caudron, J-M
Ford, N
Henkens, M
Macé, C
Kiddle-Monroe, R
Pinel, J
Affiliation: Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland; AEDES Foundation, Brussels, Belgium
Citation: Trop Med Int Health 2008;13(8):1062–72
Journal: Tropical Medicine & International Health
Issue Date: 8-Jul-2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10144/37334
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3156.2008.02106.x
PubMed ID: 18631318
Additional Links: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120747094/abstract
Abstract: The circulation of substandard medicines in the developing world is a serious clinical and public health concern. Problems include under or over concentration of ingredients, contamination, poor quality ingredients, poor stability and inadequate packaging. There are multiple causes. Drugs manufactured for export are not regulated to the same standard as those for domestic use, while regulatory agencies in the less-developed world are poorly equipped to assess and address the problem. A number of recent initiatives have been established to address the problem, most notably the WHO pre-qualification programme. However, much more action is required. Donors should encourage their partners to include more explicit quality requirements in their tender mechanisms, while purchasers should insist that producers and distributors supply drugs that comply with international quality standards. Governments in rich countries should not tolerate the export of substandard pharmaceutical products to poor countries, while developing country governments should improve their ability to detect substandard medicines.
Type: Article
Language: en
MeSH: Pharmaceutic Preparations
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Drug Contamination
Developing Countries
ISSN: 1365-3156
Rights: Archived on this site with the kind permission of Wiley-Blackwell, http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/tmi
Appears in topics: Pharmacy

Related articles on PubMed
bullet
bullet
bullet
Impact of poor-quality medicines in the 'developing' world.
Newton PN, Green MD, Fernández FM
2010 Mar
bullet
Pilot study of essential drug quality in two major cities in India.
Bate R, Tren R, Mooney L, Hess K, Mitra B, Debroy B, Attaran A
2009 Jun 23
bullet
See all 561 articles

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

OR Logo Powered by Open Repository | Cookies

My MSF

MSF logo MSF Field Research

Sep 23, 2014