The prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme and infant feeding practices.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/39573
Title:
The prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme and infant feeding practices.
Authors:
Hilderbrand, K; Goemaere, E; Coetzee, D
Journal:
South African Medical Journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskunde
Abstract:
Since the first cases of HIV transmission through breast-feeding were documented, a fierce debate has raged on appropriate guidelines for infant feeding in resource-poor settings. A major problem is determining when it is safe and feasible to formula-feed, as breast-milk protects against other diseases. A cross-sectional survey of 113 women attending the programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, was conducted. Over 95% of women on the programme formula-fed their infants and did not breast-feed at all. Seventy per cent of women said that their infant had never had diarrhoea, and only 3% of children had had two episodes of diarrhoea. Focus groups identified the main reasons for not breast-feeding given by women to their families and those around them. Formula feeding is safe and feasible in an urban environment where sufficient potable water is available.
Affiliation:
Infectious Diseases and HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town.
Issue Date:
Oct-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/39573
PubMed ID:
14652971
Language:
en
ISSN:
0256-9574
Appears in Collections:
Womens/Reproductive Health; HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHilderbrand, K-
dc.contributor.authorGoemaere, E-
dc.contributor.authorCoetzee, D-
dc.date.accessioned2008-10-24T07:58:19Z-
dc.date.available2008-10-24T07:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued2003-10-
dc.identifier.citationThe prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme and infant feeding practices. 2003, 93 (10):779-81 S. Afr. Med. J.en
dc.identifier.issn0256-9574-
dc.identifier.pmid14652971-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/39573-
dc.description.abstractSince the first cases of HIV transmission through breast-feeding were documented, a fierce debate has raged on appropriate guidelines for infant feeding in resource-poor settings. A major problem is determining when it is safe and feasible to formula-feed, as breast-milk protects against other diseases. A cross-sectional survey of 113 women attending the programme for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, was conducted. Over 95% of women on the programme formula-fed their infants and did not breast-feed at all. Seventy per cent of women said that their infant had never had diarrhoea, and only 3% of children had had two episodes of diarrhoea. Focus groups identified the main reasons for not breast-feeding given by women to their families and those around them. Formula feeding is safe and feasible in an urban environment where sufficient potable water is available.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to South African Medical Journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskundeen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshBottle Feedingen
dc.subject.meshBreast Feedingen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea, Infantileen
dc.subject.meshDisclosureen
dc.subject.meshDisease Transmission, Verticalen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshFocus Groupsen
dc.subject.meshHIV Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshInfant Formulaen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshSouth Africaen
dc.titleThe prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme and infant feeding practices.en
dc.contributor.departmentInfectious Diseases and HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town.en
dc.identifier.journalSouth African Medical Journal = Suid-Afrikaanse tydskrif vir geneeskundeen
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