Managing and Monitoring Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in a Primary Health Care Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/615939
Title:
Managing and Monitoring Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in a Primary Health Care Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi
Authors:
Manjomo, RC; Mwagomba, B; Ade, S; Ali, E; Ben-Smith, A; Khomani, P; Bondwe, P; Nkhoma, D; Douglas, GP; Tayler-Smith, K; Chikosi, L; Harries, AD; Gadabu, OJ
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
Setting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged 65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for 1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes.
Publisher:
International Union Against TB and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
21-Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/615939
Submitted date:
2016-06-29
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Operational Research Courses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorManjomo, RCen
dc.contributor.authorMwagomba, Ben
dc.contributor.authorAde, Sen
dc.contributor.authorAli, Een
dc.contributor.authorBen-Smith, Aen
dc.contributor.authorKhomani, Pen
dc.contributor.authorBondwe, Pen
dc.contributor.authorNkhoma, Den
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, GPen
dc.contributor.authorTayler-Smith, Ken
dc.contributor.authorChikosi, Len
dc.contributor.authorHarries, ADen
dc.contributor.authorGadabu, OJen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-11T14:12:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-11T14:12:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-21-
dc.date.submitted2016-06-29-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/615939-
dc.description.abstractSetting: Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Objective: Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. Design: A cross-sectional study. Results: Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged 65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for 1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80–90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60–75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41–51%) and diabetes (15–38%) was poor. Conclusion: It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against TB and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsPublished with permission thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleManaging and Monitoring Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in a Primary Health Care Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawien
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen
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