Modeling of EBV Infection and Antibody Responses in Kenyan Infants with Different Levels of Malaria Exposure Shows Maternal Antibody Decay is a Major Determinant of Early EBV Infection

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618796
Title:
Modeling of EBV Infection and Antibody Responses in Kenyan Infants with Different Levels of Malaria Exposure Shows Maternal Antibody Decay is a Major Determinant of Early EBV Infection
Authors:
Reynaldi, A; Schlub, TE; Piriou, E; Ogolla, S; Sumba, OP; Moormann, AM; Rochford, R; Davenport, MP
Journal:
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Abstract:
The combination of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and high malaria exposure are risk factors for endemic Burkitt lymphoma, and evidence suggests that infants in regions of high malaria exposure have earlier EBV infection and increased EBV reactivation. Here we analysed the longitudinal antibody response to EBV in Kenyan infants with different levels of malaria exposure. We found that high malaria exposure was associated with a faster decline of maternally-derived IgG antibody to both the EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) and Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA1), followed by a more rapid rise in antibody response to EBV antigens in children from the high malaria region. In addition, we observed the long-term persistence of anti-VCA IgM responses in children from the malaria high region. More rapid decay of maternal antibodies was a major predictor of EBV infection outcome, as decay predicted time-to EBV DNA detection, independent of high and low malaria exposure.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
28-Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618796
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiw396
PubMed ID:
27571902
Submitted date:
2016-09-06
Language:
en
ISSN:
1537-6613
Appears in Collections:
Malaria

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorReynaldi, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSchlub, TEen
dc.contributor.authorPiriou, Een
dc.contributor.authorOgolla, Sen
dc.contributor.authorSumba, OPen
dc.contributor.authorMoormann, AMen
dc.contributor.authorRochford, Ren
dc.contributor.authorDavenport, MPen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-17T13:35:52Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-17T13:35:52Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-28-
dc.date.submitted2016-09-06-
dc.identifier.citationModeling of EBV infection and antibody responses in Kenyan infants with different levels of malaria exposure shows maternal antibody decay is a major determinant of early EBV infection. 2016: J. Infect. Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1537-6613-
dc.identifier.pmid27571902-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/infdis/jiw396-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618796-
dc.description.abstractThe combination of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and high malaria exposure are risk factors for endemic Burkitt lymphoma, and evidence suggests that infants in regions of high malaria exposure have earlier EBV infection and increased EBV reactivation. Here we analysed the longitudinal antibody response to EBV in Kenyan infants with different levels of malaria exposure. We found that high malaria exposure was associated with a faster decline of maternally-derived IgG antibody to both the EBV viral capsid antigen (VCA) and Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen (EBNA1), followed by a more rapid rise in antibody response to EBV antigens in children from the high malaria region. In addition, we observed the long-term persistence of anti-VCA IgM responses in children from the malaria high region. More rapid decay of maternal antibodies was a major predictor of EBV infection outcome, as decay predicted time-to EBV DNA detection, independent of high and low malaria exposure.en
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.rightsPublished by Infectious Diseases Society of America Archived on this site with permission and copyright 200X by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, [url] and Oxford University Pressen
dc.titleModeling of EBV Infection and Antibody Responses in Kenyan Infants with Different Levels of Malaria Exposure Shows Maternal Antibody Decay is a Major Determinant of Early EBV Infectionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Infectious Diseasesen

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