Global Phylogeography and Evolutionary History of Shigella Dysenteriae Type 1

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618817
Title:
Global Phylogeography and Evolutionary History of Shigella Dysenteriae Type 1
Authors:
Njamkepo, E; Fawal, N; Tran-Dien, A; Hawkey, J; Strockbine, N; Jenkins, C; Talukder, KA; Bercion, R; Kuleshov, K; Kolínská, R; Russell, JE; Kaftyreva, L; Accou-Demartin, M; Karas, A; Vandenberg, O; Mather, AE; Mason, CJ; Page, AJ; Ramamurthy, T; Bizet, C; Gamian, A; Carle, I; Sow, AG; Bouchier, C; Wester, AL; Lejay-Collin, M; Fonkoua, MC; Hello, SL; Blaser, MJ; Jernberg, C; Ruckly, C; Mérens, A; Page, AL; Aslett, M; Roggentin, P; Fruth, A; Denamur, E; Venkatesan, M; Bercovier, H; Bodhidatta, L; Chiou, CS; Clermont, D; Colonna, B; Egorova, S; Pazhani, GP; Ezernitchi, AV; Guigon, G; Harris, SR; Izumiya, H; Korzeniowska-Kowal, A; Lutyńska, A; Gouali, M; Grimont, F; Langendorf, C; Marejková, M; Peterson, LAM; Perez-Perez, G; Ngandjio, A; Podkolzin, A; Souche, E; Makarova, M; Shipulin, GA; Ye, C; Žemličková, H; Herpay, M; Grimont, PA; Parkhill, J; Sansonetti, P; Holt, KE; Brisse, S; Thomson, NR; Weill, FX
Journal:
Nature Microbiology
Abstract:
Together with plague, smallpox and typhus, epidemics of dysentery have been a major scourge of human populations for centuries(1). A previous genomic study concluded that Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1), the epidemic dysentery bacillus, emerged and spread worldwide after the First World War, with no clear pattern of transmission(2). This is not consistent with the massive cyclic dysentery epidemics reported in Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries(1,3,4) and the first isolation of Sd1 in Japan in 1897(5). Here, we report a whole-genome analysis of 331 Sd1 isolates from around the world, collected between 1915 and 2011, providing us with unprecedented insight into the historical spread of this pathogen. We show here that Sd1 has existed since at least the eighteenth century and that it swept the globe at the end of the nineteenth century, diversifying into distinct lineages associated with the First World War, Second World War and various conflicts or natural disasters across Africa, Asia and Central America. We also provide a unique historical perspective on the evolution of antibiotic resistance over a 100-year period, beginning decades before the antibiotic era, and identify a prevalent multiple antibiotic-resistant lineage in South Asia that was transmitted in several waves to Africa, where it caused severe outbreaks of disease.
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Issue Date:
21-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618817
DOI:
10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.27
PubMed ID:
27572446
Language:
en
ISSN:
2058-5276
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNjamkepo, Een
dc.contributor.authorFawal, Nen
dc.contributor.authorTran-Dien, Aen
dc.contributor.authorHawkey, Jen
dc.contributor.authorStrockbine, Nen
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, Cen
dc.contributor.authorTalukder, KAen
dc.contributor.authorBercion, Ren
dc.contributor.authorKuleshov, Ken
dc.contributor.authorKolínská, Ren
dc.contributor.authorRussell, JEen
dc.contributor.authorKaftyreva, Len
dc.contributor.authorAccou-Demartin, Men
dc.contributor.authorKaras, Aen
dc.contributor.authorVandenberg, Oen
dc.contributor.authorMather, AEen
dc.contributor.authorMason, CJen
dc.contributor.authorPage, AJen
dc.contributor.authorRamamurthy, Ten
dc.contributor.authorBizet, Cen
dc.contributor.authorGamian, Aen
dc.contributor.authorCarle, Ien
dc.contributor.authorSow, AGen
dc.contributor.authorBouchier, Cen
dc.contributor.authorWester, ALen
dc.contributor.authorLejay-Collin, Men
dc.contributor.authorFonkoua, MCen
dc.contributor.authorHello, SLen
dc.contributor.authorBlaser, MJen
dc.contributor.authorJernberg, Cen
dc.contributor.authorRuckly, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMérens, Aen
dc.contributor.authorPage, ALen
dc.contributor.authorAslett, Men
dc.contributor.authorRoggentin, Pen
dc.contributor.authorFruth, Aen
dc.contributor.authorDenamur, Een
dc.contributor.authorVenkatesan, Men
dc.contributor.authorBercovier, Hen
dc.contributor.authorBodhidatta, Len
dc.contributor.authorChiou, CSen
dc.contributor.authorClermont, Den
dc.contributor.authorColonna, Ben
dc.contributor.authorEgorova, Sen
dc.contributor.authorPazhani, GPen
dc.contributor.authorEzernitchi, AVen
dc.contributor.authorGuigon, Gen
dc.contributor.authorHarris, SRen
dc.contributor.authorIzumiya, Hen
dc.contributor.authorKorzeniowska-Kowal, Aen
dc.contributor.authorLutyńska, Aen
dc.contributor.authorGouali, Men
dc.contributor.authorGrimont, Fen
dc.contributor.authorLangendorf, Cen
dc.contributor.authorMarejková, Men
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, LAMen
dc.contributor.authorPerez-Perez, Gen
dc.contributor.authorNgandjio, Aen
dc.contributor.authorPodkolzin, Aen
dc.contributor.authorSouche, Een
dc.contributor.authorMakarova, Men
dc.contributor.authorShipulin, GAen
dc.contributor.authorYe, Cen
dc.contributor.authorŽemličková, Hen
dc.contributor.authorHerpay, Men
dc.contributor.authorGrimont, PAen
dc.contributor.authorParkhill, Jen
dc.contributor.authorSansonetti, Pen
dc.contributor.authorHolt, KEen
dc.contributor.authorBrisse, Sen
dc.contributor.authorThomson, NRen
dc.contributor.authorWeill, FXen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T21:45:22Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-28T21:45:22Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-21-
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Phylogeography and Evolutionary History of Shigella Dysenteriae Type 1. 2016, 1:16027 Nat Microbiolen
dc.identifier.issn2058-5276-
dc.identifier.pmid27572446-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nmicrobiol.2016.27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618817-
dc.description.abstractTogether with plague, smallpox and typhus, epidemics of dysentery have been a major scourge of human populations for centuries(1). A previous genomic study concluded that Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1), the epidemic dysentery bacillus, emerged and spread worldwide after the First World War, with no clear pattern of transmission(2). This is not consistent with the massive cyclic dysentery epidemics reported in Europe during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries(1,3,4) and the first isolation of Sd1 in Japan in 1897(5). Here, we report a whole-genome analysis of 331 Sd1 isolates from around the world, collected between 1915 and 2011, providing us with unprecedented insight into the historical spread of this pathogen. We show here that Sd1 has existed since at least the eighteenth century and that it swept the globe at the end of the nineteenth century, diversifying into distinct lineages associated with the First World War, Second World War and various conflicts or natural disasters across Africa, Asia and Central America. We also provide a unique historical perspective on the evolution of antibiotic resistance over a 100-year period, beginning decades before the antibiotic era, and identify a prevalent multiple antibiotic-resistant lineage in South Asia that was transmitted in several waves to Africa, where it caused severe outbreaks of disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsWe regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.titleGlobal Phylogeography and Evolutionary History of Shigella Dysenteriae Type 1en
dc.identifier.journalNature Microbiologyen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.