Duration of Viral Suppression and Risk of Rebound Viremia with First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Uganda

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618825
Title:
Duration of Viral Suppression and Risk of Rebound Viremia with First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Uganda
Authors:
Musinguzi, N; Mocello, RA; Boum, Y; Hunt, PW; Martin, JN; Haberer, JE; Bangsberg, DR; Siedner, MJ
Journal:
AIDS and Behavior
Abstract:
Little is known about associations between viral suppression, adherence, and duration of prior viral suppression in sub-Saharan Africa. Study participants were from the UARTO study in Mbarara, Uganda. We fit regression models to characterize relationships between average adherence, treatment interruptions, and rebound viremia (>400 copies/mL) following a previously undetectable result. Our goal was to understand the impact of prior viral suppression on these relationships. 396 participants contributed 2864 quarterly visits. Restricted to periods with average adherence <50 %, each 10 % increase in adherence reduced the odds of rebound viremia by 74 % [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.26, P = 0.002] and 29 % (AOR = 0.71, P = 0.057) during the first 12 months of suppression and beyond 12 months respectively, interaction term P = 0.018. Among periods with adherence ≥50 %, the risk of rebound viremia decreased with increasing adherence during the first 12 months of viral suppression (AOR = 0.73 for each 10 % increase, P = 0.001), but not thereafter (AOR = 1.09, P = 0.67), interaction term P = 0.027. In contrast, 72-h interruptions, were associated with increased rebound viremia during the first 12 months (AOR = 1.30, P = 0.009) and after (AOR = 1.39, P = 0.005), interaction term P = 0.69. Completing 12 months of viral suppression decreases the impact of average adherence, but not prolonged treatment interruptions, on risk of rebound viremia.
Publisher:
SpringerLink We regret that this article is behind a paywall.
Issue Date:
2-Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618825
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-016-1447-1
PubMed ID:
27256394
Submitted date:
2016-06-15
Language:
en
ISSN:
1573-3254
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMusinguzi, Nen
dc.contributor.authorMocello, RAen
dc.contributor.authorBoum, Yen
dc.contributor.authorHunt, PWen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, JNen
dc.contributor.authorHaberer, JEen
dc.contributor.authorBangsberg, DRen
dc.contributor.authorSiedner, MJen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-28T22:42:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-28T22:42:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-02en
dc.date.submitted2016-06-15en
dc.identifier.citationDuration of Viral Suppression and Risk of Rebound Viremia with First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Uganda. 2016: AIDS Behaven
dc.identifier.issn1573-3254en
dc.identifier.pmid27256394en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10461-016-1447-1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618825-
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about associations between viral suppression, adherence, and duration of prior viral suppression in sub-Saharan Africa. Study participants were from the UARTO study in Mbarara, Uganda. We fit regression models to characterize relationships between average adherence, treatment interruptions, and rebound viremia (>400 copies/mL) following a previously undetectable result. Our goal was to understand the impact of prior viral suppression on these relationships. 396 participants contributed 2864 quarterly visits. Restricted to periods with average adherence <50 %, each 10 % increase in adherence reduced the odds of rebound viremia by 74 % [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.26, P = 0.002] and 29 % (AOR = 0.71, P = 0.057) during the first 12 months of suppression and beyond 12 months respectively, interaction term P = 0.018. Among periods with adherence ≥50 %, the risk of rebound viremia decreased with increasing adherence during the first 12 months of viral suppression (AOR = 0.73 for each 10 % increase, P = 0.001), but not thereafter (AOR = 1.09, P = 0.67), interaction term P = 0.027. In contrast, 72-h interruptions, were associated with increased rebound viremia during the first 12 months (AOR = 1.30, P = 0.009) and after (AOR = 1.39, P = 0.005), interaction term P = 0.69. Completing 12 months of viral suppression decreases the impact of average adherence, but not prolonged treatment interruptions, on risk of rebound viremia.en
dc.languageENGen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringerLink We regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.titleDuration of Viral Suppression and Risk of Rebound Viremia with First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy in Rural Ugandaen
dc.identifier.journalAIDS and Behavioren

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