Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618850
Title:
Altered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Authors:
Monaco, CL; Gootenberg, DB; Zhao, G; Handley, SA; Ghebremichael, MS; Lim, ES; Lankowski, A; Baldridge, MT; Wilen, CB; Flagg, M; Norman, JM; Keller, BC; Luévano, JM; Wang, D; Boum, Y; Martin, JN; Hunt, PW; Bangsberg, DR; Siedner, MJ; Kwon, DS; Virgin, HW
Journal:
Cell Host & Microbe
Abstract:
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.
Publisher:
Elsevier - We regret that this article is behind a paywall.
Issue Date:
9-Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618850
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.011
PubMed ID:
26962942
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1934-6069
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMonaco, CLen
dc.contributor.authorGootenberg, DBen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Gen
dc.contributor.authorHandley, SAen
dc.contributor.authorGhebremichael, MSen
dc.contributor.authorLim, ESen
dc.contributor.authorLankowski, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBaldridge, MTen
dc.contributor.authorWilen, CBen
dc.contributor.authorFlagg, Men
dc.contributor.authorNorman, JMen
dc.contributor.authorKeller, BCen
dc.contributor.authorLuévano, JMen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Den
dc.contributor.authorBoum, Yen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, JNen
dc.contributor.authorHunt, PWen
dc.contributor.authorBangsberg, DRen
dc.contributor.authorSiedner, MJen
dc.contributor.authorKwon, DSen
dc.contributor.authorVirgin, HWen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-17T18:18:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-17T18:18:37Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-09-
dc.identifier.citationAltered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. 2016, 19 (3):311-22 Cell Host Microbeen
dc.identifier.issn1934-6069-
dc.identifier.pmid26962942-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618850-
dc.description.abstractHuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with increased intestinal translocation of microbial products and enteropathy as well as alterations in gut bacterial communities. However, whether the enteric virome contributes to this infection and resulting immunodeficiency remains unknown. We characterized the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome in a cohort of Ugandan patients, including HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected subjects and those either treated with anti-retroviral therapy (ART) or untreated. Low peripheral CD4 T cell counts were associated with an expansion of enteric adenovirus sequences and this increase was independent of ART treatment. Additionally, the enteric bacterial microbiome of patients with lower CD4 T counts exhibited reduced phylogenetic diversity and richness with specific bacteria showing differential abundance, including increases in Enterobacteriaceae, which have been associated with inflammation. Thus, immunodeficiency in progressive HIV infection is associated with alterations in the enteric virome and bacterial microbiome, which may contribute to AIDS-associated enteropathy and disease progression.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier - We regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.titleAltered Virome and Bacterial Microbiome in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCell Host & Microbeen

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