Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618965
Title:
What is a Hotspot Anyway?
Authors:
Lessler, J; Azman, A; McKay, H; Moore, S
Journal:
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Abstract:
AbstractThe importance of spatial clusters, or "hotspots," in infectious disease epidemiology has been increasingly recognized, and targeting hotspots is often seen as an important component of disease-control strategies. However, the precise meaning of "hotspot" varies widely in current research and policy documents. Hotspots have been variously described as areas of elevated incidence or prevalence, higher transmission efficiency or risk, or higher probability of disease emergence. This ambiguity has led to confusion and may result in mistaken inferences regarding the best way to target interventions. We surveyed the literature on epidemiologic hotspots, examining the multitude of ways in which the term is used; and highlight the difference in the geographic scale of hotspots and the properties they are supposed to have. In response to the diversity in the term's usage, we advocate the use of more precise terms, such as "burden hotspot," "transmission hotspot," and "emergence hotspot," as well as explicit specification of the spatiotemporal scale of interest. Increased precision in terminology is needed to ensure clear and effective policies for disease control.
Publisher:
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Issue Date:
Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618965
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.16-0427
PubMed ID:
28719289
Additional Links:
http://www.ajtmh.org
Submitted date:
2017-07-24
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-1645
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLessler, Jen
dc.contributor.authorAzman, Aen
dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Hen
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Sen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T00:29:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-25T00:29:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-
dc.date.submitted2017-07-24-
dc.identifier.citationWhat is a Hotspot Anyway? 2017, 96 (6):1270-1273 Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.en
dc.identifier.issn1476-1645-
dc.identifier.pmid28719289-
dc.identifier.doi10.4269/ajtmh.16-0427-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618965-
dc.description.abstractAbstractThe importance of spatial clusters, or "hotspots," in infectious disease epidemiology has been increasingly recognized, and targeting hotspots is often seen as an important component of disease-control strategies. However, the precise meaning of "hotspot" varies widely in current research and policy documents. Hotspots have been variously described as areas of elevated incidence or prevalence, higher transmission efficiency or risk, or higher probability of disease emergence. This ambiguity has led to confusion and may result in mistaken inferences regarding the best way to target interventions. We surveyed the literature on epidemiologic hotspots, examining the multitude of ways in which the term is used; and highlight the difference in the geographic scale of hotspots and the properties they are supposed to have. In response to the diversity in the term's usage, we advocate the use of more precise terms, such as "burden hotspot," "transmission hotspot," and "emergence hotspot," as well as explicit specification of the spatiotemporal scale of interest. Increased precision in terminology is needed to ensure clear and effective policies for disease control.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajtmh.orgen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.titleWhat is a Hotspot Anyway?en
dc.identifier.journalThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen

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