High Hepatitis E Seroprevalence Among Displaced Persons in South Sudan

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618967
Title:
High Hepatitis E Seroprevalence Among Displaced Persons in South Sudan
Authors:
Azman, A; Bouhenia, M; Iyer, A; Rumunu, J; Laku, R; Wamala, J; Rodriguez-Barraquer, I; Lessler, J; Gignoux, E; Luquero, F; Leung, D; Gurley, E; Ciglenecki, I
Journal:
The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Abstract:
AbstractLarge protracted outbreaks of hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been documented in displaced populations in Africa over the past decade though data are limited outside these exceptional settings. Serological studies can provide insights useful for improving surveillance and disease control. We conducted an age-stratified serological survey using samples previously collected for another research study from 206 residents of an internally displaced person camp in Juba, South Sudan. We tested serum for anti-HEV antibodies (IgM and IgG) and estimated the prevalence of recent and historical exposure to the virus. Using data on individuals' serostatus, camp arrival date, and state of origin, we used catalytic transmission models to estimate the relative risk of HEV infection in the camp compared with that in the participants' home states. The age-adjusted seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 71% (95% confidence interval = 63-78), and 4% had evidence of recent exposure (IgM). We estimated HEV exposure rates to be more than 2-fold (hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% credible interval = 0.3-5.8) higher in the camp than in the participants' home states, although this difference was not statistically significant. HEV transmission may be higher than previously appreciated, even in the absence of reported cases. Improved surveillance in similar settings is needed to understand the burden of disease and minimize epidemic impact through early detection and response.
Publisher:
American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Issue Date:
Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/618967
DOI:
10.4269/ajtmh.16-0620
PubMed ID:
28719276
Additional Links:
http://www.ajtmh.org
Submitted date:
2017-07-24
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-1645
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAzman, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBouhenia, Men
dc.contributor.authorIyer, Aen
dc.contributor.authorRumunu, Jen
dc.contributor.authorLaku, Ren
dc.contributor.authorWamala, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez-Barraquer, Ien
dc.contributor.authorLessler, Jen
dc.contributor.authorGignoux, Een
dc.contributor.authorLuquero, Fen
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Den
dc.contributor.authorGurley, Een
dc.contributor.authorCiglenecki, Ien
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-25T00:35:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-25T00:35:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-
dc.date.submitted2017-07-24-
dc.identifier.citationHigh Hepatitis E Seroprevalence Among Displaced Persons in South Sudan. 2017, 96 (6):1296-1301 Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.en
dc.identifier.issn1476-1645-
dc.identifier.pmid28719276-
dc.identifier.doi10.4269/ajtmh.16-0620-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/618967-
dc.description.abstractAbstractLarge protracted outbreaks of hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been documented in displaced populations in Africa over the past decade though data are limited outside these exceptional settings. Serological studies can provide insights useful for improving surveillance and disease control. We conducted an age-stratified serological survey using samples previously collected for another research study from 206 residents of an internally displaced person camp in Juba, South Sudan. We tested serum for anti-HEV antibodies (IgM and IgG) and estimated the prevalence of recent and historical exposure to the virus. Using data on individuals' serostatus, camp arrival date, and state of origin, we used catalytic transmission models to estimate the relative risk of HEV infection in the camp compared with that in the participants' home states. The age-adjusted seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 71% (95% confidence interval = 63-78), and 4% had evidence of recent exposure (IgM). We estimated HEV exposure rates to be more than 2-fold (hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% credible interval = 0.3-5.8) higher in the camp than in the participants' home states, although this difference was not statistically significant. HEV transmission may be higher than previously appreciated, even in the absence of reported cases. Improved surveillance in similar settings is needed to understand the burden of disease and minimize epidemic impact through early detection and response.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajtmh.orgen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.titleHigh Hepatitis E Seroprevalence Among Displaced Persons in South Sudanen
dc.identifier.journalThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen

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