Research Priorities to Achieve Universal Access to Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Among People Who Inject Drugs

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619009
Title:
Research Priorities to Achieve Universal Access to Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Among People Who Inject Drugs
Authors:
Grebely, J; Bruneau, J; Lazarus, J; Dalgard, O; Bruggmann, P; Treloar, C; Hickman, M; Hellard, M; Roberts, T; Crooks, L; Midgard, H; Larney, S; Degenhardt, L; Alho, H; Byrne, J; Dillon, J; Feld, J; Foster, G; Goldberg, D; Lloyd, A; Reimer, J; Robaeys, G; Torrens, M; Wright, N; Maremmani, I; Norton, B; Litwin, A; Dore, G
Journal:
The International Journal on Drug Policy
Abstract:
Globally, it is estimated that 71.1 million people have chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including an estimated 7.5 million people who have recently injected drugs (PWID). There is an additional large, but unquantified, burden among those PWID who have ceased injecting. The incidence of HCV infection among current PWID also remains high in many settings. Morbidity and mortality due to liver disease among PWID with HCV infection continues to increase, despite the advent of well-tolerated, simple interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) HCV regimens with cure rates >95%. As a result of this important clinical breakthrough, there is potential to reverse the rising burden of advanced liver disease with increased treatment and strive for HCV elimination among PWID. Unfortunately, there are many gaps in knowledge that represent barriers to effective prevention and management of HCV among PWID. The Kirby Institute, UNSW Sydney and the International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU) established an expert round table panel to assess current research gaps and establish future research priorities for the prevention and management of HCV among PWID. This round table consisted of a one-day workshop held on 6 September, 2016, in Oslo, Norway, prior to the International Symposium on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU 2016). International experts in drug and alcohol, infectious diseases, and hepatology were brought together to discuss the available scientific evidence, gaps in research, and develop research priorities. Topics for discussion included the epidemiology of injecting drug use, HCV, and HIV among PWID, HCV prevention, HCV testing, linkage to HCV care and treatment, DAA treatment for HCV infection, and reinfection following successful treatment. This paper highlights the outcomes of the roundtable discussion focused on future research priorities for enhancing HCV prevention, testing, linkage to care and DAA treatment for PWID as we strive for global elimination of HCV infection.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Issue Date:
3-Jul-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619009
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.019
PubMed ID:
28683982
Submitted date:
2017-07-11
Language:
en
Description:
We regret that this article is behind a paywall.
ISSN:
1873-4758
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrebely, Jen
dc.contributor.authorBruneau, Jen
dc.contributor.authorLazarus, Jen
dc.contributor.authorDalgard, Oen
dc.contributor.authorBruggmann, Pen
dc.contributor.authorTreloar, Cen
dc.contributor.authorHickman, Men
dc.contributor.authorHellard, Men
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Ten
dc.contributor.authorCrooks, Len
dc.contributor.authorMidgard, Hen
dc.contributor.authorLarney, Sen
dc.contributor.authorDegenhardt, Len
dc.contributor.authorAlho, Hen
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Jen
dc.contributor.authorDillon, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFeld, Jen
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Gen
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, Den
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Aen
dc.contributor.authorReimer, Jen
dc.contributor.authorRobaeys, Gen
dc.contributor.authorTorrens, Men
dc.contributor.authorWright, Nen
dc.contributor.authorMaremmani, Ien
dc.contributor.authorNorton, Ben
dc.contributor.authorLitwin, Aen
dc.contributor.authorDore, Gen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-07T13:14:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-07T13:14:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-03-
dc.date.submitted2017-07-11-
dc.identifier.citationResearch Priorities to Achieve Universal Access to Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Among People Who Inject Drugs. 2017 Int. J. Drug Policyen
dc.identifier.issn1873-4758-
dc.identifier.pmid28683982-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.019-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619009-
dc.descriptionWe regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.description.abstractGlobally, it is estimated that 71.1 million people have chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including an estimated 7.5 million people who have recently injected drugs (PWID). There is an additional large, but unquantified, burden among those PWID who have ceased injecting. The incidence of HCV infection among current PWID also remains high in many settings. Morbidity and mortality due to liver disease among PWID with HCV infection continues to increase, despite the advent of well-tolerated, simple interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) HCV regimens with cure rates >95%. As a result of this important clinical breakthrough, there is potential to reverse the rising burden of advanced liver disease with increased treatment and strive for HCV elimination among PWID. Unfortunately, there are many gaps in knowledge that represent barriers to effective prevention and management of HCV among PWID. The Kirby Institute, UNSW Sydney and the International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU) established an expert round table panel to assess current research gaps and establish future research priorities for the prevention and management of HCV among PWID. This round table consisted of a one-day workshop held on 6 September, 2016, in Oslo, Norway, prior to the International Symposium on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU 2016). International experts in drug and alcohol, infectious diseases, and hepatology were brought together to discuss the available scientific evidence, gaps in research, and develop research priorities. Topics for discussion included the epidemiology of injecting drug use, HCV, and HIV among PWID, HCV prevention, HCV testing, linkage to HCV care and treatment, DAA treatment for HCV infection, and reinfection following successful treatment. This paper highlights the outcomes of the roundtable discussion focused on future research priorities for enhancing HCV prevention, testing, linkage to care and DAA treatment for PWID as we strive for global elimination of HCV infection.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.titleResearch Priorities to Achieve Universal Access to Hepatitis C Prevention, Management and Direct-Acting Antiviral Treatment Among People Who Inject Drugsen
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal on Drug Policyen

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