The 'Indirect Costs' of Underfunding Foreign Partners in Global Health Research: A Case Study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619025
Title:
The 'Indirect Costs' of Underfunding Foreign Partners in Global Health Research: A Case Study
Authors:
Crane, J; Andia B; Fouad, T; Boum, Y; R Bangsberg, D
Journal:
Global Public Health
Abstract:
This study of a global health research partnership assesses how U.S. fiscal administrative policies impact capacity building at foreign partner institutions. We conducted a case study of a research collaboration between Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in Mbarara, Uganda, and originally the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), but now Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Our case study is based on three of the authors' experiences directing and working with this partnership from its inception in 2003 through 2015. The collaboration established an independent Ugandan non-profit to act as a local fiscal agent and grants administrator and to assure compliance with the Ugandan labour and tax law. This structure, combined with low indirect cost reimbursements from U.S. federal grants, failed to strengthen institutional capacity at MUST. In response to problems with this model, the collaboration established a contracts and grants office at MUST. This office has built administrative capacity at MUST but has also generated new risks and expenses for MGH. We argue that U.S. fiscal administrative practices may drain rather than build capacity at African universities by underfunding the administrative costs of global health research, circumventing host country institutions, and externalising legal and financial risks associated with international work.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Issue Date:
16-Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619025
DOI:
10.1080/17441692.2017.1372504
PubMed ID:
28920518
Submitted date:
2017-09-26
Language:
en
ISSN:
1744-1706
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrane, Jen
dc.contributor.authorAndia Ben
dc.contributor.authorFouad, Ten
dc.contributor.authorBoum, Yen
dc.contributor.authorR Bangsberg, Den
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-06T15:41:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-06T15:41:11Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-16-
dc.date.submitted2017-09-26-
dc.identifier.citationThe 'Indirect Costs' of Underfunding Foreign Partners in Global Health Research: A Case Study. 2017:1-8 Glob Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1744-1706-
dc.identifier.pmid28920518-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17441692.2017.1372504-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619025-
dc.description.abstractThis study of a global health research partnership assesses how U.S. fiscal administrative policies impact capacity building at foreign partner institutions. We conducted a case study of a research collaboration between Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST) in Mbarara, Uganda, and originally the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), but now Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Our case study is based on three of the authors' experiences directing and working with this partnership from its inception in 2003 through 2015. The collaboration established an independent Ugandan non-profit to act as a local fiscal agent and grants administrator and to assure compliance with the Ugandan labour and tax law. This structure, combined with low indirect cost reimbursements from U.S. federal grants, failed to strengthen institutional capacity at MUST. In response to problems with this model, the collaboration established a contracts and grants office at MUST. This office has built administrative capacity at MUST but has also generated new risks and expenses for MGH. We argue that U.S. fiscal administrative practices may drain rather than build capacity at African universities by underfunding the administrative costs of global health research, circumventing host country institutions, and externalising legal and financial risks associated with international work.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relationFree access to this article was provided by kind permission of Taylor & Francisen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Global Public Healthen
dc.titleThe 'Indirect Costs' of Underfunding Foreign Partners in Global Health Research: A Case Studyen
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Public Healthen

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