Survivors' Perceptions of Public Health Messages During an Ebola Crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone: An Exploratory Study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619027
Title:
Survivors' Perceptions of Public Health Messages During an Ebola Crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone: An Exploratory Study
Authors:
Schwerdtle, P; De Clerck, V; Plummer, V
Journal:
Nursing & Health Sciences
Abstract:
The outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone was the largest epidemic of Ebola ever recorded. The healthcare workforce was diminished and exhausted as the region emerged from civil war. Few qualitative, descriptive studies have been conducted to date that concentrate on the voices of Ebola survivors and their perceptions of health messages. In this study, we employed an interpretive, qualitative design to explore participant experiences. Twenty five survivors who had recovered from Ebola were recruited from three villages in Liberia and Sierra Leone in August 2015. Data were collected using semistructured interviews. Data analysis revealed four themes: (i) degrees of mistrust; (ii) messages conflicting with life and culture; (iii) seeing is believing; and (iv) recovery inspires hope. The findings were explored in the context of the relevant literature. The themes highlight the need to develop culturally-appropriate messages, underpinned by a sound understanding of the community and a willingness to work with the culture and trusted leaders.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Issue Date:
20-Sep-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619027
DOI:
10.1111/nhs.12372
PubMed ID:
28929557
Submitted date:
2017-09-27
Language:
en
Description:
We regret that this article is behind a paywall.
ISSN:
1442-2018
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchwerdtle, Pen
dc.contributor.authorDe Clerck, Ven
dc.contributor.authorPlummer, Ven
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-06T15:48:07Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-06T15:48:07Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-20-
dc.date.submitted2017-09-27-
dc.identifier.citationSurvivors' Perceptions of Public Health Messages During an Ebola Crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone: An Exploratory Study. 2017 Nurs Health Scien
dc.identifier.issn1442-2018-
dc.identifier.pmid28929557-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/nhs.12372-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619027-
dc.descriptionWe regret that this article is behind a paywall.en
dc.description.abstractThe outbreak of Ebola virus disease in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone was the largest epidemic of Ebola ever recorded. The healthcare workforce was diminished and exhausted as the region emerged from civil war. Few qualitative, descriptive studies have been conducted to date that concentrate on the voices of Ebola survivors and their perceptions of health messages. In this study, we employed an interpretive, qualitative design to explore participant experiences. Twenty five survivors who had recovered from Ebola were recruited from three villages in Liberia and Sierra Leone in August 2015. Data were collected using semistructured interviews. Data analysis revealed four themes: (i) degrees of mistrust; (ii) messages conflicting with life and culture; (iii) seeing is believing; and (iv) recovery inspires hope. The findings were explored in the context of the relevant literature. The themes highlight the need to develop culturally-appropriate messages, underpinned by a sound understanding of the community and a willingness to work with the culture and trusted leaders.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nursing & Health Sciencesen
dc.titleSurvivors' Perceptions of Public Health Messages During an Ebola Crisis in Liberia and Sierra Leone: An Exploratory Studyen
dc.identifier.journalNursing & Health Sciencesen

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