Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: successes and missed opportunities

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619048
Title:
Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: successes and missed opportunities
Authors:
Coldiron, ME; Von Seidlein, L; Grais, RF
Journal:
Malaria Journal
Abstract:
Seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) was recommended in 2012 for young children in the Sahel during the peak malaria transmission season. Children are given a single dose of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combined with a 3-day course of amodiaquine, once a month for up to 4 months. Roll-out and scale-up of SMC has been impressive, with 12 million children receiving the intervention in 2016. There is evidence of its overall benefit in routine implementation settings, and a meta-analysis of clinical trial data showed a 75% decrease in clinical malaria compared to placebo. SMC is not free of shortcomings. Its target zone includes many hard-to-reach areas, both because of poor infrastructure and because of political instability. Treatment adherence to a 3-day course of preventive treatment has not been fully documented, and could prove challenging. As SMC is scaled up, integration into a broader, community-based paradigm which includes other preventive and curative activities may prove beneficial, both for health systems and for recipients.
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Issue Date:
28-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619048
DOI:
10.1186/s12936-017-2132-1
PubMed ID:
29183327
Submitted date:
2017-12-15
Language:
en
ISSN:
1475-2875
Appears in Collections:
Malaria

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColdiron, MEen
dc.contributor.authorVon Seidlein, Len
dc.contributor.authorGrais, RFen
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-20T23:49:41Z-
dc.date.available2017-12-20T23:49:41Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-28-
dc.date.submitted2017-12-15-
dc.identifier.citationSeasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: successes and missed opportunities. 2017, 16 (1):481 Malar. J.en
dc.identifier.issn1475-2875-
dc.identifier.pmid29183327-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12936-017-2132-1-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619048-
dc.description.abstractSeasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) was recommended in 2012 for young children in the Sahel during the peak malaria transmission season. Children are given a single dose of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine combined with a 3-day course of amodiaquine, once a month for up to 4 months. Roll-out and scale-up of SMC has been impressive, with 12 million children receiving the intervention in 2016. There is evidence of its overall benefit in routine implementation settings, and a meta-analysis of clinical trial data showed a 75% decrease in clinical malaria compared to placebo. SMC is not free of shortcomings. Its target zone includes many hard-to-reach areas, both because of poor infrastructure and because of political instability. Treatment adherence to a 3-day course of preventive treatment has not been fully documented, and could prove challenging. As SMC is scaled up, integration into a broader, community-based paradigm which includes other preventive and curative activities may prove beneficial, both for health systems and for recipients.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.rightsPublished by BioMed Central, [url]http://www.malariajournal.com/[/url] Archived on this site by Open Access permissionen
dc.titleSeasonal Malaria Chemoprevention: successes and missed opportunitiesen
dc.identifier.journalMalaria Journalen

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