Anthropology in public health emergencies:what is anthropology good for?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619085
Title:
Anthropology in public health emergencies:what is anthropology good for?
Authors:
Stellmach, D; Beshar, I; Bedford, J; du Cros, P; Stringer, B
Journal:
BMJ Global Health
Abstract:
Recent outbreaks of Ebola virus disease (2013-2016) and Zika virus (2015-2016) bring renewed recognition of the need to understand social pathways of disease transmission and barriers to care. Social scientists, anthropologists in particular, have been recognised as important players in disease outbreak response because of their ability to assess social, economic and political factors in local contexts. However, in emergency public health response, as with any interdisciplinary setting, different professions may disagree over methods, ethics and the nature of evidence itself. A disease outbreak is no place to begin to negotiate disciplinary differences. Given increasing demand for anthropologists to work alongside epidemiologists, clinicians and public health professionals in health crises, this paper gives a basic introduction to anthropological methods and seeks to bridge the gap in disciplinary expectations within emergencies. It asks: 'What can anthropologists do in a public health crisis and how do they do it?' It argues for an interdisciplinary conception of emergency and the recognition that social, psychological and institutional factors influence all aspects of care.
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Issue Date:
25-Mar-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619085
DOI:
10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000534
PubMed ID:
29607097
Submitted date:
2018-04-06
Language:
en
ISSN:
2059-7908
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStellmach, Den
dc.contributor.authorBeshar, Ien
dc.contributor.authorBedford, Jen
dc.contributor.authordu Cros, Pen
dc.contributor.authorStringer, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-06T21:02:59Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-06T21:02:59Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-25-
dc.date.submitted2018-04-06-
dc.identifier.citationAnthropology in public health emergencies:what is anthropology good for? 2018, 3 (2):e000534 BMJ Glob Healthen
dc.identifier.issn2059-7908-
dc.identifier.pmid29607097-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjgh-2017-000534-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619085-
dc.description.abstractRecent outbreaks of Ebola virus disease (2013-2016) and Zika virus (2015-2016) bring renewed recognition of the need to understand social pathways of disease transmission and barriers to care. Social scientists, anthropologists in particular, have been recognised as important players in disease outbreak response because of their ability to assess social, economic and political factors in local contexts. However, in emergency public health response, as with any interdisciplinary setting, different professions may disagree over methods, ethics and the nature of evidence itself. A disease outbreak is no place to begin to negotiate disciplinary differences. Given increasing demand for anthropologists to work alongside epidemiologists, clinicians and public health professionals in health crises, this paper gives a basic introduction to anthropological methods and seeks to bridge the gap in disciplinary expectations within emergencies. It asks: 'What can anthropologists do in a public health crisis and how do they do it?' It argues for an interdisciplinary conception of emergency and the recognition that social, psychological and institutional factors influence all aspects of care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ Global Healthen
dc.titleAnthropology in public health emergencies:what is anthropology good for?en
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Global Healthen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.