Knockdown and recovery of malaria diagnosis and treatment in Liberia during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreak

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619127
Title:
Knockdown and recovery of malaria diagnosis and treatment in Liberia during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreak
Authors:
Dunbar, NK; Richards, EE; Woldeyohannes, D; Van den Bergh, R; Wilkinson, E; Tamang, D; Owiti, P
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
Setting: The malaria-endemic country of Liberia, before, during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreak. Objective: To describe the consequences of the Ebola outbreak on Liberia's National Malaria Programme and its post-Ebola recovery. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study using routine countrywide programme data. Results: Malaria caseloads decreased by 47% during the Ebola outbreak and by 11% after, compared to the pre-Ebola period. In those counties most affected by Ebola, a caseload reduction of >20% was sustained for 12 consecutive months, while this lasted for only 4 consecutive months in the counties least affected by Ebola. Linear regression of monthly proportions of confirmed malaria cases-as a proxy indicator of programme performance-over the pre- and post-Ebola periods indicated that the malaria programme could require 26 months after the end of the acute phase of the Ebola outbreak to recover to pre-Ebola levels. Conclusions: The differential persistence of reduced caseloads in the least- and most-affected counties, all of which experienced similar emergency measures, suggest that factors other than Ebola-related security measures played a key role in the programme's reduced performance. Clear guidance on when to abandon the emergency measures after an outbreak may be needed to ensure faster recovery of malaria programme performance.
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
21-Jun-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619127
DOI:
10.5588/pha.16.0100
PubMed ID:
28744443
Submitted date:
2018-05-16
Language:
en
ISSN:
2220-8372
Appears in Collections:
Operational Research Courses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDunbar, NKen
dc.contributor.authorRichards, EEen
dc.contributor.authorWoldeyohannes, Den
dc.contributor.authorVan den Bergh, Ren
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Een
dc.contributor.authorTamang, Den
dc.contributor.authorOwiti, Pen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:02:49Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:02:49Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-21-
dc.date.submitted2018-05-16-
dc.identifier.citationKnockdown and recovery of malaria diagnosis and treatment in Liberia during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreak. 2017, 7 (Suppl 1):S76-S81 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372-
dc.identifier.pmid28744443-
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.16.0100-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619127-
dc.description.abstractSetting: The malaria-endemic country of Liberia, before, during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreak. Objective: To describe the consequences of the Ebola outbreak on Liberia's National Malaria Programme and its post-Ebola recovery. Design: A retrospective cross-sectional study using routine countrywide programme data. Results: Malaria caseloads decreased by 47% during the Ebola outbreak and by 11% after, compared to the pre-Ebola period. In those counties most affected by Ebola, a caseload reduction of >20% was sustained for 12 consecutive months, while this lasted for only 4 consecutive months in the counties least affected by Ebola. Linear regression of monthly proportions of confirmed malaria cases-as a proxy indicator of programme performance-over the pre- and post-Ebola periods indicated that the malaria programme could require 26 months after the end of the acute phase of the Ebola outbreak to recover to pre-Ebola levels. Conclusions: The differential persistence of reduced caseloads in the least- and most-affected counties, all of which experienced similar emergency measures, suggest that factors other than Ebola-related security measures played a key role in the programme's reduced performance. Clear guidance on when to abandon the emergency measures after an outbreak may be needed to ensure faster recovery of malaria programme performance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleKnockdown and recovery of malaria diagnosis and treatment in Liberia during and after the 2014 Ebola outbreaken
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen

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