Moving towards malaria elimination: trends and attributes of cases in Kavango region, Namibia, 2010-2014

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619147
Title:
Moving towards malaria elimination: trends and attributes of cases in Kavango region, Namibia, 2010-2014
Authors:
Nghipumbwa, H; Ade, S; Kizito, W; Takarinda, KC; Uusiku, P; Mumbegegwi, DR
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
Setting: Kavango, a 'moderate' transmission risk region located in north-eastern Namibia, borders Angola, a country with higher malaria transmission levels. Objective: To determine 1) the trends in malaria incidence between 2010 and 2014 in Kavango, 2) the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed cases in 2014, and 3) associated risk factors of cases classified as imported. Design: This was a retrospective study of malaria case investigation forms conducted in all 52 public health facilities in 2014. Incidence was derived from aggregate routine surveillance data from the Health Information System (HIS). Results: During the 5-year study, incidence fell from 53.6 to 3.6 cases per 1000 population, then increased again to 47.3/1000. Fifty-five per cent of cases were males, and 49% were aged between 5 and 17 years. Of the 2014 cases, 23% were imported, and were associated with higher odds of severe malaria (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.8; 95%CI 1.01-3.29), not having long-lasting insecticide treated nets (aOR 2.1, 95%CI, 1.3-3.4) and not receiving insecticide residual spraying (aOR 3.2, 95%CI, 2.1-5.1). Conclusion: Sporadic outbreaks in the 5-year period posed a threat to malaria elimination. Better targeting of vector control interventions, strong cross-border collaboration and robust health promotion will be key to achieving malaria elimination.
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
25-Apr-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619147
DOI:
10.5588/pha.17.0076
PubMed ID:
29713589
Submitted date:
2018-05-11
Language:
en
ISSN:
2220-8372
Appears in Collections:
Operational Research Courses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNghipumbwa, Hen
dc.contributor.authorAde, Sen
dc.contributor.authorKizito, Wen
dc.contributor.authorTakarinda, KCen
dc.contributor.authorUusiku, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMumbegegwi, DRen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:38:40Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:38:40Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-25-
dc.date.submitted2018-05-11-
dc.identifier.citationMoving towards malaria elimination: trends and attributes of cases in Kavango region, Namibia, 2010-2014. 2018, 8 (Suppl 1):S18-S23 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372-
dc.identifier.pmid29713589-
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.17.0076-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619147-
dc.description.abstractSetting: Kavango, a 'moderate' transmission risk region located in north-eastern Namibia, borders Angola, a country with higher malaria transmission levels. Objective: To determine 1) the trends in malaria incidence between 2010 and 2014 in Kavango, 2) the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of confirmed cases in 2014, and 3) associated risk factors of cases classified as imported. Design: This was a retrospective study of malaria case investigation forms conducted in all 52 public health facilities in 2014. Incidence was derived from aggregate routine surveillance data from the Health Information System (HIS). Results: During the 5-year study, incidence fell from 53.6 to 3.6 cases per 1000 population, then increased again to 47.3/1000. Fifty-five per cent of cases were males, and 49% were aged between 5 and 17 years. Of the 2014 cases, 23% were imported, and were associated with higher odds of severe malaria (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.8; 95%CI 1.01-3.29), not having long-lasting insecticide treated nets (aOR 2.1, 95%CI, 1.3-3.4) and not receiving insecticide residual spraying (aOR 3.2, 95%CI, 2.1-5.1). Conclusion: Sporadic outbreaks in the 5-year period posed a threat to malaria elimination. Better targeting of vector control interventions, strong cross-border collaboration and robust health promotion will be key to achieving malaria elimination.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleMoving towards malaria elimination: trends and attributes of cases in Kavango region, Namibia, 2010-2014en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen

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