Low uptake of preventive interventions among malaria cases in Swaziland: towards malaria elimination

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619152
Title:
Low uptake of preventive interventions among malaria cases in Swaziland: towards malaria elimination
Authors:
Makadzange, K; Dlamini, N; Zulu, Z; Dlamini, S; Kunene, S; Sikhondze, W; Owiti, P; Geoffroy, E; Zachariah, R; Mengestu, TK
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
Settings: Swaziland is striving to achieve sustainable malaria elimination. Three preventive interventions are vital for reaching this goal: 1) effective household utilisation of long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs), 2) indoor residual spraying (IRS), and 3) provision of chemoprophylaxis for those travelling to malaria-endemic areas. Objectives: To assess the uptake of preventive intervention among confirmed malaria cases. Design: A longitudinal study using nation-wide programme data from 2010 to 2015. Data on malaria cases from health facilities were sourced from the Malaria Surveillance Database System. Results: Of a total 2568 confirmed malaria cases in Swaziland, 2034 (79%) had complete data on case investigations and were included in the analysis. Of 341 (17%) individuals who owned LLINs, 169 (8%) used them; 338 (17%) had IRS and 314 (15%) slept in sprayed structures. Of 1403 travellers to areas at high malaria risk, 59 (4%) used any form of malaria prevention, including chemoprophylaxis. Conclusion: The uptake of all three key malaria prevention interventions is low, and could threaten the progress made thus far toward malaria elimination. Efforts to improve this situation, including qualitative research to understand the reasons for low uptake, are urgently needed.
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
25-Apr-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619152
DOI:
10.5588/pha.17.0016
PubMed ID:
29713591
Submitted date:
2018-05-11
Language:
en
ISSN:
2220-8372
Appears in Collections:
Operational Research Courses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMakadzange, Ken
dc.contributor.authorDlamini, Nen
dc.contributor.authorZulu, Zen
dc.contributor.authorDlamini, Sen
dc.contributor.authorKunene, Sen
dc.contributor.authorSikhondze, Wen
dc.contributor.authorOwiti, Pen
dc.contributor.authorGeoffroy, Een
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren
dc.contributor.authorMengestu, TKen
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:43:32Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:43:32Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-25-
dc.date.submitted2018-05-11-
dc.identifier.citationLow uptake of preventive interventions among malaria cases in Swaziland: towards malaria elimination. 2018, 8 (Suppl 1):S29-S33 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372-
dc.identifier.pmid29713591-
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.17.0016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619152-
dc.description.abstractSettings: Swaziland is striving to achieve sustainable malaria elimination. Three preventive interventions are vital for reaching this goal: 1) effective household utilisation of long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs), 2) indoor residual spraying (IRS), and 3) provision of chemoprophylaxis for those travelling to malaria-endemic areas. Objectives: To assess the uptake of preventive intervention among confirmed malaria cases. Design: A longitudinal study using nation-wide programme data from 2010 to 2015. Data on malaria cases from health facilities were sourced from the Malaria Surveillance Database System. Results: Of a total 2568 confirmed malaria cases in Swaziland, 2034 (79%) had complete data on case investigations and were included in the analysis. Of 341 (17%) individuals who owned LLINs, 169 (8%) used them; 338 (17%) had IRS and 314 (15%) slept in sprayed structures. Of 1403 travellers to areas at high malaria risk, 59 (4%) used any form of malaria prevention, including chemoprophylaxis. Conclusion: The uptake of all three key malaria prevention interventions is low, and could threaten the progress made thus far toward malaria elimination. Efforts to improve this situation, including qualitative research to understand the reasons for low uptake, are urgently needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleLow uptake of preventive interventions among malaria cases in Swaziland: towards malaria eliminationen
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen

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