From diagnosis to case investigation for malaria elimination in Swaziland: is reporting and response timely?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619153
Title:
From diagnosis to case investigation for malaria elimination in Swaziland: is reporting and response timely?
Authors:
Dlamini, N; Zulu, Z; Kunene, S; Geoffroy, E; Ntshalintshali, N; Owiti, P; Sikhondze, W; Makadzange, K; Zachariah, R
Journal:
Public Health Action
Abstract:
Background: Swaziland is one of the southern African countries that aim to eliminate malaria by 2020. In 2010, the country introduced an Immediate Disease Notification System (IDNS) for immediate reporting of notifiable diseases, including malaria. Health facilities are to report malaria cases within 24 h through a toll-free telephone number (977), triggering an alert for case investigation at the patient's household within 48 h. We assessed the completeness of reporting in the IDNS, the subsequent case investigation, and whether it was done within the stipulated timelines. Methods: A cross-sectional study using routine country-wide data. Results: Of 1991 malaria cases notified between July 2011 and June 2015, 76% were reported in the IDNS, of which 68% were investigated-a shortfall of 24% in reporting and 32% in case investigations. Of the 76% of cases reported through the IDNS, 62% were reported within 24 h and 20% were investigated within 48 h. These shortcomings were most pronounced in hospitals and private facilities. Investigated cases (n = 1346) were classified as follows: 60% imported, 35% local and 5% undetermined. Conclusion: The utilisation of the IDNS for case reporting to trigger investigation is crucial for active surveillance. There is a need to address the reporting and investigation gaps identified to ensure that malaria cases receive appropriate interventions.
Publisher:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Issue Date:
25-Apr-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619153
DOI:
10.5588/pha.17.0043
PubMed ID:
29713587
Submitted date:
2018-05-11
Language:
en
ISSN:
2220-8372
Appears in Collections:
Operational Research Courses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDlamini, Nen
dc.contributor.authorZulu, Zen
dc.contributor.authorKunene, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGeoffroy, Een
dc.contributor.authorNtshalintshali, Nen
dc.contributor.authorOwiti, Pen
dc.contributor.authorSikhondze, Wen
dc.contributor.authorMakadzange, Ken
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-17T14:44:09Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-17T14:44:09Z-
dc.date.issued2018-04-25-
dc.date.submitted2018-05-11-
dc.identifier.citationFrom diagnosis to case investigation for malaria elimination in Swaziland: is reporting and response timely? 2018, 8 (Suppl 1):S8-S12 Public Health Actionen
dc.identifier.issn2220-8372-
dc.identifier.pmid29713587-
dc.identifier.doi10.5588/pha.17.0043-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619153-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Swaziland is one of the southern African countries that aim to eliminate malaria by 2020. In 2010, the country introduced an Immediate Disease Notification System (IDNS) for immediate reporting of notifiable diseases, including malaria. Health facilities are to report malaria cases within 24 h through a toll-free telephone number (977), triggering an alert for case investigation at the patient's household within 48 h. We assessed the completeness of reporting in the IDNS, the subsequent case investigation, and whether it was done within the stipulated timelines. Methods: A cross-sectional study using routine country-wide data. Results: Of 1991 malaria cases notified between July 2011 and June 2015, 76% were reported in the IDNS, of which 68% were investigated-a shortfall of 24% in reporting and 32% in case investigations. Of the 76% of cases reported through the IDNS, 62% were reported within 24 h and 20% were investigated within 48 h. These shortcomings were most pronounced in hospitals and private facilities. Investigated cases (n = 1346) were classified as follows: 60% imported, 35% local and 5% undetermined. Conclusion: The utilisation of the IDNS for case reporting to trigger investigation is crucial for active surveillance. There is a need to address the reporting and investigation gaps identified to ensure that malaria cases receive appropriate interventions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Public Health Actionen
dc.titleFrom diagnosis to case investigation for malaria elimination in Swaziland: is reporting and response timely?en
dc.identifier.journalPublic Health Actionen

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