For Family-Centered Differentiated Service Delivery for HIV

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619259
Title:
For Family-Centered Differentiated Service Delivery for HIV
Authors:
Grimsrud, A; Bygrave, H; Wilkinson, L
Journal:
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Abstract:
Differentiated care, or differentiated service delivery (DSD), is increasingly being promoted as one of the possible ways to address and improve access, quality, and efficiency of HIV prevention, care, and treatment. Family-centered care has long been promoted within the provision of HIV services, but the full benefits have not necessarily been realized. In this article, we bring together these two approaches and make the case for how family-centered DSD can offer benefits to both people affected by HIV and the health system. Family-centered DSD approaches are presented for HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery, referencing policies, best practice examples, and evidence from the field. With differentiated family-centered ART delivery, the potential efficiencies gained by extending ART refills can both benefit clients by reducing the frequency and intensity of contact with the health service and lead to health system gains by not requiring multiple providers to care for one family. A family-centered DSD approach should also be leveraged along the HIV care cascade in the provision of prevention technologies and mobilizing family members to receive regular HIV testing. Furthermore, a family-centered lens should be applied wherever DSD is implemented to ensure that, for example, adolescents who are pregnant receive an adapted package of quality care.
Publisher:
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Issue Date:
15-Aug-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/619259
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0000000000001733
PubMed ID:
29994834
Submitted date:
2018-07-17
Language:
en
ISSN:
1944-7884
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGrimsrud, Aen
dc.contributor.authorBygrave, Hen
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Len
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-08T16:29:23Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-08T16:29:23Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-15-
dc.date.submitted2018-07-17-
dc.identifier.citationFor Family-Centered Differentiated Service Delivery for HIV. 2018, 78 Suppl 2:S124-S127 J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.en
dc.identifier.issn1944-7884-
dc.identifier.pmid29994834-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/QAI.0000000000001733-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/619259-
dc.description.abstractDifferentiated care, or differentiated service delivery (DSD), is increasingly being promoted as one of the possible ways to address and improve access, quality, and efficiency of HIV prevention, care, and treatment. Family-centered care has long been promoted within the provision of HIV services, but the full benefits have not necessarily been realized. In this article, we bring together these two approaches and make the case for how family-centered DSD can offer benefits to both people affected by HIV and the health system. Family-centered DSD approaches are presented for HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery, referencing policies, best practice examples, and evidence from the field. With differentiated family-centered ART delivery, the potential efficiencies gained by extending ART refills can both benefit clients by reducing the frequency and intensity of contact with the health service and lead to health system gains by not requiring multiple providers to care for one family. A family-centered DSD approach should also be leveraged along the HIV care cascade in the provision of prevention technologies and mobilizing family members to receive regular HIV testing. Furthermore, a family-centered lens should be applied wherever DSD is implemented to ensure that, for example, adolescents who are pregnant receive an adapted package of quality care.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkinsen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromesen
dc.titleFor Family-Centered Differentiated Service Delivery for HIVen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromesen

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in MSF are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.