How health systems in sub-Saharan Africa can benefit from tuberculosis and other infectious disease programmes.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/85113
Title:
How health systems in sub-Saharan Africa can benefit from tuberculosis and other infectious disease programmes.
Authors:
Harries, A D; Jensen, P M; Zachariah, R; Rusen, I D; Enarson, D A
Journal:
The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease
Abstract:
Weak and dysfunctional health systems in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, are recognised as major obstacles to attaining the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. Some progress is being made towards achieving the targets of Millennium Development Goal 6 for tuberculosis (TB), HIV/AIDS and malaria, with the achievements largely resulting from clearly defined strategies and intervention delivery systems combined with large amounts of external funding. This article is divided into four main sections. The first highlights the crucial elements that are needed in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa to deliver good quality health care through general health systems. The second discusses the main characteristics of infectious disease and TB control programmes. The third illustrates how TB control and other infectious disease programmes can help to strengthen these components, particularly in human resources; infrastructure; procurement and distribution; monitoring, evaluation and supervision; leadership and stewardship. The fourth and final section looks at progress made to date at the international level in terms of policy and guidelines, with some specific suggestions about this might be moved forward at the national level. For TB and other infectious disease programmes to drive broad improvements in health care systems and patient care, the lessons that have been learnt must be consciously applied to the broader health system, and sufficient financial input and the engagement of all players are essential.
Affiliation:
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France. adharries@theunion.org
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/85113
PubMed ID:
19793422
Language:
en
ISSN:
1815-7920
Appears in Collections:
Health Politics

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarries, A Den
dc.contributor.authorJensen, P Men
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ren
dc.contributor.authorRusen, I Den
dc.contributor.authorEnarson, D Aen
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-01T23:42:32Z-
dc.date.available2009-11-01T23:42:32Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.citationHow health systems in sub-Saharan Africa can benefit from tuberculosis and other infectious disease programmes. 2009, 13 (10):1194-9 Int. J. Tuberc. Lung Dis.en
dc.identifier.issn1815-7920-
dc.identifier.pmid19793422-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/85113-
dc.description.abstractWeak and dysfunctional health systems in low-income countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, are recognised as major obstacles to attaining the health-related Millennium Development Goals by 2015. Some progress is being made towards achieving the targets of Millennium Development Goal 6 for tuberculosis (TB), HIV/AIDS and malaria, with the achievements largely resulting from clearly defined strategies and intervention delivery systems combined with large amounts of external funding. This article is divided into four main sections. The first highlights the crucial elements that are needed in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa to deliver good quality health care through general health systems. The second discusses the main characteristics of infectious disease and TB control programmes. The third illustrates how TB control and other infectious disease programmes can help to strengthen these components, particularly in human resources; infrastructure; procurement and distribution; monitoring, evaluation and supervision; leadership and stewardship. The fourth and final section looks at progress made to date at the international level in terms of policy and guidelines, with some specific suggestions about this might be moved forward at the national level. For TB and other infectious disease programmes to drive broad improvements in health care systems and patient care, the lessons that have been learnt must be consciously applied to the broader health system, and sufficient financial input and the engagement of all players are essential.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
dc.titleHow health systems in sub-Saharan Africa can benefit from tuberculosis and other infectious disease programmes.en
dc.contributor.departmentInternational Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France. adharries@theunion.orgen
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease : the official journal of the International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Diseaseen
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