Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in Malawi-implications for managing other chronic diseases in resource-limited countries.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/88073
Title:
Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in Malawi-implications for managing other chronic diseases in resource-limited countries.
Authors:
Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Jahn, Andreas; Schouten, Erik J; Kamoto, Kelita
Journal:
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)
Abstract:
The national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi is based on the public health approach, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course) tuberculosis control framework. The key principles include political commitment, free care, and standardized systems for case finding, treatment, recording and reporting, and drug procurement. Scale-up of ART started in June 2004, and by December 2008, 223,437 patients were registered for treatment within a health system that is severely underresourced. The Malawi model for delivering lifelong ART can be adapted and used for managing patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, the burden of which is already high and continues to grow in low-income and middle-income countries. This article discusses how the principles behind the successful Malawi model of ART delivery can be applied to the management of other chronic diseases in resource-limited settings and how this paradigm can be used for health systems strengthening.
Affiliation:
International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France. adharries@theunion.org
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/88073
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181bbc99e
PubMed ID:
19858929
Language:
en
ISSN:
1944-7884
Appears in Collections:
Chronic Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarries, Anthony Den
dc.contributor.authorZachariah, Ronyen
dc.contributor.authorJahn, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorSchouten, Erik Jen
dc.contributor.authorKamoto, Kelitaen
dc.date.accessioned2009-12-15T21:23:44Z-
dc.date.available2009-12-15T21:23:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-01-
dc.identifier.citationScaling up antiretroviral therapy in Malawi-implications for managing other chronic diseases in resource-limited countries. 2009, 52 Suppl 1:S14-6 J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr.en
dc.identifier.issn1944-7884-
dc.identifier.pmid19858929-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181bbc99e-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/88073-
dc.description.abstractThe national scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Malawi is based on the public health approach, with principles and practices borrowed from the successful DOTS (directly observed treatment, short course) tuberculosis control framework. The key principles include political commitment, free care, and standardized systems for case finding, treatment, recording and reporting, and drug procurement. Scale-up of ART started in June 2004, and by December 2008, 223,437 patients were registered for treatment within a health system that is severely underresourced. The Malawi model for delivering lifelong ART can be adapted and used for managing patients with chronic noncommunicable diseases, the burden of which is already high and continues to grow in low-income and middle-income countries. This article discusses how the principles behind the successful Malawi model of ART delivery can be applied to the management of other chronic diseases in resource-limited settings and how this paradigm can be used for health systems strengthening.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)en
dc.subject.meshAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshAnti-HIV Agentsen
dc.subject.meshAntiretroviral Therapy, Highly Activeen
dc.subject.meshChronic Diseaseen
dc.subject.meshHealth Resourcesen
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Administrationen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMalawien
dc.titleScaling up antiretroviral therapy in Malawi-implications for managing other chronic diseases in resource-limited countries.en
dc.contributor.departmentInternational Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France. adharries@theunion.orgen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)en
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